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Photography Posing Tips | 3 Foundation Poses To Build A Couples Shoot

By Holly Roa on September 6th 2017

Posing can feel so daunting when there are so many little things to notice. Every visible body part can tell a story and you want to be sure that story is one of intention and not of a missed detail on the photographer’s part. Add a second person and your concerns double.

So, with so much to think about, where should you even begin? Start from the bottom and work your way up. What your couples do with their feet will dictate what happens with the rest of their bodies. A little thing called “foundation posing” can make your life so much easier as a photographer – here are three examples of foundation poses.

CLOSED

In a ‘closed’ foundation pose, two subjects face one another with their feet pointing toward the other. This pose is intimate, so check to make sure that other parts of the couple are in agreement with the feet. For example, if one of the subjects’ head is leaning away from the other, they will lessen the appearance of intimacy. If you notice conflicting body language, simply instruct an alternative. In the case of the example given, you could say “can you lean your heads in toward one another?”

OPEN

In an ‘open’ foundation pose, the subject’s feet are both turned toward the camera, opening their stances up to the camera. This is a pose that is less intimate than a ‘closed’ pose but is great for showing off what the couple is wearing, particularly at a wedding where the greatest attention has been paid to every detail of clothing and they will want images to hold that memory forever.

STACKED

In a ‘stacked’ foundation pose, the couple’s feet are ‘stacked,’ meaning that one is standing behind and slightly to the side of the other with their feet facing the same direction. This can be a really cute, nurturing pose where one partner appears supportive of the other. In this pose, watch for the subject in the back appearing as if they are ‘hiding.’ If they look too obscured by the partner in the front, have them step slightly more to the side.

[REWIND:] USE POSING CUES TO POSE FOR STORY

By giving your clients a little instruction on what these terms mean, you can easily give them verbal cues to change their position to use a variety of poses for your session. With micro-adjustments, a whole set of compelling images can be made based on these foundation poses plus two more which you can find in our Premium workshop, The Complete Posing Workshop.

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About

Seattle based photographer with a side of videography, specializing in work involving animals, but basically a Jill of all trades.
Instagram: @HJRphotos

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