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export-images-lightroom Tips & Tricks

Photoshop and Lightroom Image Resizing Resource Guide

By Tanya Goodall Smith on December 21st 2015

In case you haven’t noticed, I’ve written a few articles about re-sizing images lately. They were all written with this comprehensive guide to resizing images in Photoshop and Lightroom in mind. I originally set out to write this guide and realized we were missing some important basics. Now that those are covered, here’s your Photoshop and Lightroom image resizing resource guide, featuring links to articles covering most everything you could ever need to know on the topic.

How to Resize Images in Photoshop

RESIZE PHOTOS IN PHOTOSHOP | THE 5 MOST COMMON METHODS

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Follow step-by-step instructions with screen shot examples in this tutorial, where I cover the five most common methods for resizing images in Photoshop, which include:

  • Crop
  • Image Size
  • Canvas Size
  • Save for Web
  • Export As

HOW TO BATCH RESIZE IMAGES IN PHOTOSHOP IN SECONDS

In this tutorial, I show you how to batch resize images using an image processor script. I later learned from a community member that there’s a pro version of this script, which gives you more options for resizing. You can download that action on the Adobe blog.

HOW TO CREATE PHOTOSHOP ACTIONS THE RIGHT WAY SO THEY WORK EVERY TIME

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You can also batch process images using an action in Photoshop. In this tutorial, Max shows us how to create actions the right way, so they work every time. I, myself, have not tried resizing with an action, but if you frequently resize images in Photoshop to specific sizes, for a blog, or example, it would certainly save a lot of time.

RESIZE AND SHARPEN YOUR IMAGES FOR THE WEB USING PHOTOSHOP INSTEAD OF LIGHTROOM

In this article, Anthony shares the below video, as well as screenshots and a summary of the video. Steve Perry shows us his method for sharpening and resizing images for the web in Photoshop without losing detail from compression. He also explains why he chooses to resize and sharpen images for the web in Photoshop instead of Lightroom.

How to Resize Images in Lightroom

THE 9 BASICS OF EXPORTING IN LIGHTROOM

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In this tutorial, Pye explains the nine basics of exporting in Lightroom. The article is an excerpt from the Lightroom Organization and Workflow DVD, the first DVD of the Lightroom Workshop Collection. Designed to give photographers a ground up foundation in the Lightroom catalog system, image management and organization, Lightroom customization and much more, these tips will increase the speed of your processing by 5 to 10 times.

The SLR Lounge Workshop helped me speed up my workflow drastically, and I even developed my own editing style after using the Lightroom Preset System. It saves me so much time!

HOW TO CREATE A PRINT-SIZED IMAGE EXPORT PRESET IN LIGHTROOM

Here’s another excerpt from our Lightroom Workshop Collection. Pye shows us how to create a print-sized export preset in Lightroom. These presets are actually included in the latest version of the Lightroom Presets, which is one more way the Preset System saves you time.

HOW TO CREATE A WEB-SIZED IMAGE EXPORT PRESET IN LIGHTROOM

After you create your print size exports, you’ll probably want a web-sized preset, too. You can create one for any size you want, actually. I’ve created one for Facebook, blog, SLR Lounge articles, print, etc. so when I’m exporting I don’t even have to think about numbers, I just click on the preset in the menu, choose the location where I want it to be saved and press the export button. Viola!

Tanya Goodall Smith is the owner, brand strategist and commercial photographer at WorkStory Corporate Photography in Spokane, Washington. WorkStory creates visual communications that make your brand irresistible to your target market. Join the stock photo rebellion at workstoryphotography.com.

Q&A Discussions

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  1. Stephen Glass

    Excellent resource here. Thanks for getting this together!

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  2. Armands Sprogis

    Now this is what I was looking for. Awesome. I always was wondering how to do all print size export in LR. Thanks for this.

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  3. Barry Chapman

    Thanks for this, it’s a useful collection of info. But I have a couple of comments with regard to Steve Perry’s choice of Photoshop over Lightroom and his workflow.

    First, the reason he gives for his choice is that there are sometimes areas he doesn’t want to sharpen within an image. I believe that careful use of the masking slider within Lightroom’s sharpening panel can often achieve the same result. And where more selective control is desired it can be achieved by using the sharpness slider with an adjustment brush. Admittedly using layer masks within Photoshop gives more precise control, but I think in many cases proper use of Lightroom can achieve good results.

    Second, his workflow and presumably his actions change the image mode from 16 bit to 8 bit before converting the profile to sRGB. I’d have thought it was better to convert the profile while you still have 16 bits of color information available and then change to 8 bit.

    In any case I appreciate him taking the time to share his workflow and actions and will be checking them out.

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    • Stan Rogers

      Photoshop has two things going for it that Lightroom/ACR can’t touch: luminosity masks and focus masks. Those are two huge (and quick) qualifiers for selective sharpening; I wouldn’t want to try to duplicate either using brushes in LR. What you lose switching applications, you regain in automation, so there’s no big loss. You also get several types of sharpening (and de-sharpening) to chose from, and they’re not interchangeable (though the differences wouldn’t necessarily show up in a video). You can also grab textures from alternate developments of an image to lay them into deep shadows or bright highlights without messing with the overall tonality of the main image, which is something that sharpening in a single development can’t even emulate. Are you going to need all of that for every picture? Probably not, but there are very good reasons for leaving Lr nonetheless.

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    • Barry Chapman

      So Stan, I have no argument with any of what you said but Steve Perry’s workflow and actions make no use of luminosity masks or focus masks. I was just pointing out that sharpening in Lightroom doesn’t have to be global.

      What’s your opinion on converting the colorspace after changing to 8 bit, rather than before?

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    • Stan Rogers

      It really makes no discernible difference. It would be a different story if you were to do major modifications to the image after converting.

      The thing about a workflow is that consistency is good. Otherwise it’s a disjoint set of contingencies. Doing half the job in one program, then deciding that it’s inadequate, rolling back the changes you’ve made, then jumping to a different program isn’t a workflow.

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    • Barry Chapman

      The International Color Consortium has the following regarding converting the profile in 16 or 8 bit:
      “Q. Should I expect any smoother conversion using a 16bit file and converting from rgb to cmyk in photoshop compared with an 8 bit file.

      A. In principle you should get better results with a 16-bit image, although in practice the difference is rarely visible unless you make significant changes to the image during editing. ”

      So that aligns with what you said while also agreeing with my view in principle.

      You say that jumping between programs isn’t good but I’d note that I wasn’t suggesting that at all, in fact I was making the point that often (and I never said always), acceptable results can be obtained by staying within Lightroom.

      The implementation of the masking slider in Lightroom’s Detail panel is somewhat similar to that of a focus mask in Photoshop. A good visual demonstration of it can be found here (although it’s an old link and I don’t agree with all that’s said there) http://mcpactions.com/2012/09/14/lightroom-sharpening-layer-mask-the-hidden-secret/ While it can’t be fine tuned as precisely as in Photoshop, it does provide a useful form of selective sharpening within Lightroom.

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