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News & Insight

Do You Need To Feed Your Wedding Photographer? Brides.com Says No.

By Hanssie on February 4th 2016

In a recent article on Brides.com, wedding planner Sandy Malone raised the ire of wedding photographers everywhere when she posed the question, Which Wedding Vendors Do You Have To Feed At Your Wedding? Sandy suggests in her post that the wedding planning team (who will be there from sun up to sun down), should be fed. But she then states that, for the other vendors, unless it is contractually obligated, the answer is no. Sandy says,

My general rule is that, if you’re working just the wedding itself— five or six hours — feed yourself or pack a lunch to eat in the staff break area if you cannot survive the shift. A photographer, for example, should be taking pictures through the wedding dinner (with some breaks to let people unselfconsciously feed themselves without a camera in their faces).

The exception to the rule, Sandy states, is for destination weddings, where the vendor may be staying somewhere where there are not many late night dining options.

{cue outrage from photographers everywhere}

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Not so fast. Apparently, not all photographers think that a bride is obligated to feed their wedding photographers (this was the opinion from one of our writers, a non-wedding photographer). So I can see where the thought comes from, but as a wedding photographer myself, I have some strong opinions on this matter having worked weddings that lasted up to 15+ hours. Of course, every studio is different, has different policies and procedures, and you do what works for you.

What Sandy’s article does, though, is remind wedding photographers who feel like they should be fed, to put it in your contract.

wedding-table-hanssie

My Personal Opinion As a Wedding Photographer

My answer as to who should be fed at a wedding is everybody. But I’m Asian, and it’s in my culture to feed everyone, at all times. As a wedding photographer though, I still believe it should be everyone. There have been weddings where I leave an hour or so early from my house to budget for traffic and then drive an hour or two to get a wedding with plenty of time to scope out the venue. This is before my contractual time begins. I’ve left the house as early as 5 am for a 12 pm start time – this is for a 5-6 hour wedding as the article mentioned. I pack a protein bar or two for midday; that’s all I have room for. This puts me of not having a full meal from 5 am to my end time of 6-7 pm (if I end the minute my contract states I end – and honestly, how many of you wedding photographers leave the minute your contract says stop?)

[REWIND: HOW TO HELP YOUR BRIDES SET UP A REALISTIC TIMELINE FOR THE WEDDING DAY]

The article suggests that for a 5-6 hour wedding, vendors should pack their own lunch. In this scenario, I would need to either bring a cooler and leave it in my car – which means I need to leave and go to my car and get my food, then come back and scarf it down because, I “should be taking pictures through the wedding dinner,” or carry around a meal with me the entire day (if you’ve ever shot a wedding in Southern California in August, that is not only disgusting, but probably unsafe. Salmonella, anyone?)

I’m not asking or even suggesting that I be fed the $80 a plate filet minion that the guests are eating; I’ve been to plenty of weddings where I’ve gotten a vendor meal with a sandwich, chips, and apple. And that’s okay with me; I don’t expect to be treated as a guest, because I’m not. I’ve been served $1000-a-plate lamb chop at a charity event and I ate that with the same amount of speed and gratitude as a boxed vendor meal.

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Don’t get me wrong, I’m not looking for a free fancy dinner at the expense of my client. For me personally, I work better when I’m fed. You may be able to fast all day and still be productive, but not I, which is why it is clearly stated in my contract that a meal be provided for my second shooter and myself (it also gives them the option to choose that we leave the wedding to get our own food – like a 30-minute dinner break – no one ever chooses that option). This is the part where I also try to educate my brides when we go over the contract. I let them know that when we eat, we will do so quickly and hopefully when the other guests are eating so that their guest can “unselfconsciously feed themselves without a camera in their faces.” I’ve never had a bride not be okay with that.

So all this to say, that if you want to be fed, you should put it in your contract. Don’t assume that you will be fed, especially when wedding planners like Sandy are out there educating brides not to feed their vendors – herself excluded.

What do you think? Is Sandy the wedding planner out of her mind, or should wedding photographers be fed on a wedding day? I’m sure some of you have horror stories to share. Feel free in the comments below. 

About

Hanssie is a Southern California-based writer and sometimes portrait and wedding photographer. In her free time, she homeschools, works out, rescues dogs and works in marketing for SLR Lounge. She also blogs about her adventures and about fitness when she’s not sick of writing so much. Check out her work and her blog at www.hanssie.com. Follow her on Instagram

Q&A Discussions

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  1. Ken Marcou

    Of course wedding photographers should be fed. They’re the only vendor there ALL DAY with the couple. What wedding is 5-6 hours. A wedding photographers day is at least 10 hours for a standard 8 hour wedding shoot.

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  2. Luca Viola

    Guys, I’m a photographer from Italy… I want to tell you what I did at my wedding.
    The photographer + second shooter and the singer had been feeded, not only: they where sitted at my table and where invited to join the dinner without think at their job!
    May be beacause I’m Italian, or may be I’m a really smart guy or everithing you think, but my opinion is that they are a part of my party, and not only they are there to work for me! That’s why they deserved all my thanks and my respect! (…and mine was a wedding with about 60 people, no more)

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  3. Kevin Dinh

    I think the article has been deleted. I got curious and clicked to find out but the article is no longer there. Did the uproar from photographers caused her to back down? :) I was going to voice my own opinion about this.

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    • Matthew Saville

      Yes, the original article was deleted, however I believe other sites have screenshots hosted if you’d like to read what was actually said. Either way, the original site never had comments enabled anyways, it was mostly a twitter outrage.

      If you do get the chance to read the actual, original text, I think you might see that this could have just been a misunderstanding or a mistake of naivety on the part of the writer, who is a wedding planner on a small tropical island apparently.

      She didn’t say, “Don’t feed your wedding photographers” flat out. What she said was, “people who work 5-6 hours or less don’t need to be fed”, …and then she made the mistake of placing photographers in that category, maybe because that’s just the common thing where she works.

      If she had known that 99% of the photographers who would read her article were all working 10-12+ hour weddings, she never would have put them in that category, I suspect.

      Just my opinion, though.

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  4. Nik Morina

    I see some people have reached out to her through twiter with comments. Although we all are a bit fustrauted and disapointed from her writing, I would sugest that we take the high road and not tweet at her at all.

    This article and many more out there have done enough of a job to showcase how wrong her article was. Peace and love to everyone :)

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  5. John Sheehan

    Just a FYI.

    I went on Twitter and wrote the following:
    “@brides , what happened to the @SandyMalone_ advice post “Which Vendors Do You Have to Feed at Your Wedding?” Why was it removed?”

    That was the whole text of the tweet. I wasn’t disrespectful nor did I show any anger. I just asked a simple question.

    Sandy Malone has now blocked me on Twitter.

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    • Justin Haugen

      I asked her “how tired are you of responding to angry photographers?” and she blocked me.

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    • robert s

      you should been more respectful like I did and ask her if shes eating the photographers dishes as well as hers and thats why shes a size 100 and telling couples not to feed the photogs. and then I was blocked. I dont really do twitter. fat disgusting pig @sandy malone

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    • Aidan Morgan

      Robert, I don’t need to read your comments about a person’s size. Remember that people of all sizes and shapes are on these forums.

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  6. Richard Neal

    Each to their own I guess but I specifically state that I do not want to be fed by the couple but I will take my break when they are eating as guests do not like photos being taken while stuffing their faces. If the bride is insistent then I tell them it will be away from the guests. I’m working the same as all the other vendors and even though ive been there longer I still think its reasonable I provide my own meal.

    The only exceptions for me if it was a destination wedding or one that required an overnight stay.

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    • John Sheehan

      For me, and I’ve only done a handful of weddings at this point, it’s nice to have the option. The first wedding I did was twelve hours and didn’t eat except for the snack bars my wife put in my camera bag. The next one was a small one that lasted five to six hours, but I was dead tired and starving by the time everyone was seated and eating. I appreciated the little box meal the caterer had for other vendors like the DJ and myself (a turkey club, pickle, bag of chips and a cold coke)*. I have it in my contract, but that doesn’t mean I always have to take the meal.

      *I actually prefer a meal like this when I’m working, because sometimes the rich food they serve at weddings upsets my tummy.

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  7. John Sheehan

    The original article was taken down, but thanks to the elephant minded web, it was archived.

    https://web.archive.org/web/20160129075112/http://www.brides.com/blogs/aisle-say/2016/01/which-wedding-vendors-do-you-have-to-feed.html

    Please note, I didn’t find this myself, it was mentioned in an article on SLRLounge’s sister site, FStoppers by Sean Molin.

    https://fstoppers.com/business/yes-wedding-photographers-should-be-fed-no-you-cannot-delete-anything-internet-113235

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  8. Paddy McDougall

    It is in my contract and I always discuss it with couples when meeting them. Excluding travel I start aprox 10am and the first dance can be 6 – 8pm depending on how the wedding has gone. Then a photo booth into the night. The food doesn’t need to be fancy and I will eat when the couple are eating (don’t know anyone who likes their picture taken when they are eating). Sometimes the couple have asked me and my second shooter to eat with guests and others in a separate part of the venue. I always give my second shooter a break. I have never had a couple say no.

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  9. Pye Jirsa

    I find these articles very funny. This reminds me of the Vogue article, about not hiring a professional photographer to shoot the wedding.

    Honestly, we are all photographers here, so it is easy to get upset about this kind of stuff. But, from a clients perspective, this is all foreign territory. Wedding couples for the most part just don’t know about these things, they don’t know who they should feed, who they should tip, etc.

    Most of our weddings are coordinated, and they generally always make sure we are fed. I think in my entire career with hundreds of weddings under my belt, I have only not been fed once maybe twice.

    It’s our job to educate our clients on our needs. Let them know that without food, someone from the team must leave the property to get food for the team. I can pretty much guarantee they would rather provide you food, so you can get back to shooting quicker.

    The only thing here that I wish vendors/hotel staff/coordination would understand is like what Justin said above. Photographers/Cinema need to be fed BEFORE the guests are done eating. Otherwise, there is simply no time to take a break. Once the guests are done with their food, the program is back on and we can’t stop to do anything.

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    • robert s

      we have that problem often. people are standing at the buffet and it wouldnt be proper we push to be first in line. we have to wait for the majority to take their food. at that time 1 of us are usuallu doing table shots. I dont have an opinion regarding that. I ask the couple if they want. the majority say yes! and if not then I go ask the parents if there are friends or coworkers theyd like to take pictures with and they most certainly say yes. Id rather we’d be eating but if we didnt at least ask then it could be problematic later with the “why didnt u ask us” while one of us is doing the rounds of table shots the other 2-3 are eating.

      when the eating stops and goes back to dancing/continuing the event, they grab their gear and start and the last one doing table shots goes eats and then joins the staff 15 minutes later. no issues.

      I never had any event that I was told “no food for you” just never happened.

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  10. Nik Morina

    Many of us photographers have the meal included on our contracts. And yes it totally ridiculous to even think about not feeding your photographer.

    I don’t want to talk about all that, lets just look at this from another perspective:

    Moral Perspective:
    Lets assume that there is no photographers in the world, and there are no cameras at all. In such a scenario lets ask one question: How would wedding planners show their work to potential clients, if there were no cameras, no pictures?
    Exactly, they couldn’t.

    They would have to have big warehouses with many showrooms, or maybe have someone paint their work, and good how long would that take….. Many of wedding planners use professional photographs taken at the weddings to showcase how good of a job they have done, planning, decorating, and so forth. Now this right here tell’s you how important the photographer is.

    Now why would you go and bite the hand that helps you? I am not talking just for this article, I am talking in general, where we all can think of bad experiences that we have had with wedding planners.

    Technical Perspective:
    Me personally, when I go to photograph a wedding, I am caring 70+ pounds worth of equipment with me at all time,. On top of that I will be on my feet for 10+ hours, even if the wedding is 6 or 8 hours long. And to top it of I have to be super punctilious with the eye of an eagle not to miss a moment, and in doing so I have to bring my best artistic skills to it.
    We do all this so the bride and groom can have an everlasting memory of their special day.

    Now why would you “a wedding planner” like to make it harder for the photographer to do his job?

    Lets recap, his photographs, will be used for your portfolio for you to show how amazing you are at your job. His photographs will be used for the bride and groom to relive their special day.

    To you dear wedding planner, why would do that!!!!

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    • robert s

      unless the photographer is a veteran with hundreds of wedding shot, no one can understand. its a difficult job physically and mentally with tons of stress to get “must have shots” every event. you MUST deliver. its very satisfying on a personal level, but fuck, we need to eat. and that doesnt including cereal, a protein bar or sandwich.

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  11. Justin Haugen

    Today I learned that we photographers get hangry. Eat a snickers.

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  12. Paul Empson

    I never expect to be fed, I’m an adult and well able to plan ahead for my work. I’d certainly not stipulate that being fed was a contractual obligation.

    I wait to be asked and if the couple offer a meal I’ll gladly accept.. and request something small to eat with a hot pot of tea.. at the bar or at least away from the main party.

    Most venues find it easiest to serve what the wedding party is having so if that is offered by the venue, fabulous.

    Even after the couple have offered a meal I still pack something in the car just in case the venue are preoccupied and forget.

    I find it quite ironic that the planner expects their staff to be fed but no others.. seems to be a flaw in their planning, imho.

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  13. Charles Magrin

    I did not state it in my contracts but I ask my clients to make sure my second shooter / assistant and I will be fed. I tell them we don’t absolutely need the 80$ plate but that we need something to sustain ourselves so we make the best work possible with the energy that’s needed to do so. My weddings generaly last between 8 and 12 hours, meaning i will be active for a good 10 to 15 hours overall. My clients never gave me sandwiches but the nice $$ plate. Before mentioning it, half of the time clients were simply not thinking about it, which I understand quite well with all they have in mind that day. a well fed photographer will produce better images than a starving one. lately though I changed my diet and started fasting, and I tell you than going to the cross fit after a 36hour fast is totally fine for me, but i don’t spend as much energy one hour cross fit than an entire wedding shoot…

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  14. Kim Farrelly

    Wedding I shot last week, said to the bride that she would need to feed us – just some simple bar food – as nobody likes being photographed when eating its a good time for us to backup shots and change batteries and such. She insisted that we eat the same 7 courses they where. I guess some people are just nice.

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    • robert s

      they know and see how hard a photog works. they know you have their best interest in mind. youre their shadow all day. closer to them then their family. you are there to photograph delicate emotions that others dont see. we are devoted and dedicated

      no theyre not “just” nice, theyre humane.

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  15. Olivier Borgognon

    I personally think it is common sense to feed a photographer when the work is going through the meal and evening.

    I found myself doing some weddings starting at 10am and ending at 2am the next morning and the bride and groom just told us (the main photographer and myself) that they hadn’t counted us in (but the DJ and other staff were included). It was somehow a bit of a shock as nobody can go for 16 hours non stop without eating or drinking, and somehow that was normal for photographers.

    What I now tell bride and grooms is that if the plan goes onto the meal, then meal should be included, but as many have already said, i would not expect the same meal as guests. Vendor meals are fine and I even tell them that if they wish, a plate with some of the cocktail elements works, it’s just about having something in the stomach to work efficiently for them.

    I however do recommend that i am not “hidden” in a back room miles away, which would prevent me from grabbing my camera and catching a moment if it occurs.

    Now a colleague has a much harsher policy when going for a 15+ hour event gets that kind of reply, he just kindly asks them where the closest restaurant or pub is in order for him to head there when he finds it appropriate. I don’t believe this is the most appropriate reply either but it rings a bell for his customers.

    As i am working on my policies and how to manage clients, If a customer doesn’t feel that it is normal to feed the team working for them on such long missions, I would simply decline the work and client as they are not my “ideal client” and don’t pass my red velvet rope policy.

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  16. Sam Lesser

    One time we told a bride we’d take some photos of her and the groom after dinner. Then as soon as we sit down to eat, a bridal attendant comes to grab us because the bride wants to do the pictures now. I got to take one bite of my food which was gone by the time we came back. When her guests asked her what she was doing she responded laughing “taking photos during dinner like the bride’s supposed to!” This was on a 10+ hr day at a venue we’re at every weekend that I can always count on being given dinner so that really ticked me off. I hadn’t eaten all day. Since then I’ve learned to always try to eat something quick from cocktail hour.

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  17. Stephen Jennings

    “Need” to feed the photographer? .. I don’t think it’s a necessity, I mean when I do all day photography for an agency or whatever no one ever feeds me.. I’ve never put it in a wedding contract or anything. But I’ve also been practically force fed at every wedding I’ve shot, so it’s been a non issue. Why wouldn’t you let the staff eat and take a break? .. I wouldn’t be taking photos of people eating anyways, that’s weird.

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    • robert s

      we do table shots when people are eating. the BG come to the table. everyone clap with shouts of mazal tov. they say “he can we do a picture with all of you” (I told them to persuade everyone to come to their side, and I have eye contact with them where to stand for a proper shot) and half get up and move over, they stand together, 2-3 images and boom, next table. its not an issue at all. but im not from the US. we dont have those toasts. people are stuffing their faces. and part are even slow dancing as the dj puts slow ambient music on at that time.

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  18. John Sheehan

    I just tried to read the Brides’ article, and it appears to be deleted. I think the writer, after spending the day defending the article on Twitter, took it down, or asked for it to be taken down. Thoughts?

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  19. Matthew Saville

    IMO the writer (Sandy) simply didn’t realize which vendors work how many hours.

    Actually, if all I ever did were 5-6 hour gigs, I wouldn’t care. I’d bounce outta there at a decent hour, and hit up In N Out on my way home. Or Miguel’s Jr.

    The problem, of course, is that Sandy (inadvertently?) lumped all photographers into a category that is just not typical of the industry.

    Both in Southern California AND at the dozen or more weddings I’ve photographed all around the country, a (decently priced) wedding gig is 10+ hours long for an “ordinary” church wedding, and as soon as you add any of the cultural ceremonies, from Asian to South Asian to Jewish, Persian, etc….the extra hours pile on real quick. As Hanssie stated, 15+ hour wedding days is rather common for me. Oh, and that’s actual coverage time, folks, it doesn’t count driving to the job. My current record is 22 hours total, for one wedding, if you count from the moment I stepped out of my apartment to the moment I got back home.

    So, I’m barely lucky to cram down some breakfast and throw together a sandwich at 5/6 AM, let alone worry about making dinner plans.

    Thankfully, as out of touch with the industry as Sandy is, the brides I’ve booked are apparently similarly out of line with such advice- I’ve photographed hundreds of weddings over the past 12+ years, and have never once been completely denied a meal. Kitchen staff (not wedding planners) have tried to stiff me a couple times, but thankfully I’ve always found a way to get some food in my belly. Otherwise if your toasts are at 9 PM and I haven’t eaten more than a cliff bar in 24 hours, my stomach will be growling so loud it’ll distract the wedding guests.

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    • Ben Perrin

      Wow, how did you manage after 22 hours? Did you have the strength to download the images to your computer or was it just straight to bed?

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    • robert s

      I never transfer images the night I come back. its always in the morning.

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    • Ant Motton

      This gets better…..

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  20. John Cavan

    The one, and will remain the only one, time I photographed a wedding I got fed. It was for my cousin, though, and she also extended open bar to me. It’s the Irish in us.

    However, anecdote aside, I think the photographer should be fed. It comes down to recognizing that hungry people don’t perform to peak and so if you want good results, feed ’em. Depending on the meal plan it may not be what the guests are having, but a decent meal with the necessary calories is a drop in the bucket in the overall cost and, if nothing else, is kind of courteous.

    I may be biased though, I like you folks. ;)

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  21. Justin Haugen

    I don’t have it in my contract, but I always get fed so it hasn’t been a problem. The biggest thorn in my side is catering/hotel managers who insist that my team eat after all the guests. They are practically challenging us not to eat because by the time everyone else has gotten food, the bride and groom have finished eating and start mingling with tables.

    We are all working on the same team. Guests won’t think anything of it to see us get our food before them, and I’m obviously going to INHALE my food and immediately get to work.

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    • robert s

      its not really an issue. we have a set plan if that happens. we order food, and if it comes later and the bg finish first, one of us goes and does pictures. the other starts eating. when theyre done the others switch them. same with table shots. when food is served, the BG want table shots. one does the tables, the others eat. then when the dancing restarts the others switch. the other eats and the other photographs. its not a problem.

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  22. Paul Nguyen

    I know of a wedding photographer who asked for a meal and was refused. He said that he’ll just go to the local McDonalds and be back in 20 minutes. They quickly complied. Having proper lunch breaks is part of any job. If your job doesn’t really permit lunch breaks, food should be provided.

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  23. Raymond Bayot

    The problem here is that the Event Planner has blatantly wrote “not to feed photographers” because in her mind we are less important than her role in the wedding.
    Her article then will give that perception and in some cases (thanks to people like her) where couples are happy to spend the money on getting Event Planners, a beautiful Venue full of awesome Flowers and then look for a cheaper photographer.
    But when the Day is over and the Venue is closed, the Event Planner moves on and the flowers die, There is only always the 1 thing that’s left and that’s the Photographers.
    We still see the couple long after the Big Day has pass and the Images we capture will last them a lifetime.
    Love and Feed us, as we are part of what makes the Wedding Day that much more special.

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    • robert s

      exactly. images and memories and emotions. no one will remember anything about the wedding in a year and most likely a week later.

      if a BG EVER told me and my staff no food/pack ur own food, it would not be to their best interest. suddenly id switch toi standard mode and Id only take “simple” “say cheese” images and nothing else. no candids or creative shots. simple flash in your face group pics. I wouldnt want referrals from her and wouldnt deal with such a person again. if theyd call for any event theyd have a, a quick “im not available that day, thanks”

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  24. Mike Upton

    It’s a tricky one, that’s for sure. Usually, it’s something I’ll talk about with the bride and groom. I present it as them having one of two options: Either me and my second shooter get a meal (doesn’t have to be much, or even good looking) or we take a 30-minute break while people are eating for us to grab a bite (either pre-packed or nearby). But what I really disagree with is that photogs “should be taking pictures at dinner anyway”. This is obviously a wedding planner who thinks photographers are just camera monkeys who push a button and overcharge for it. I tell all my brides that unless they have MAJOR objections to it, I don’t shoot much, if at all, while people are eating. No one wants to be photographed with a face full of food and I’ve never had a bride like any of the photos like that after they demanded I do.

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    • Hanssie

      Yes, my personal policy is not to be photographing while the guests are eating unless otherwise requested but I do know some studios that have a photographer on the floor at all times no matter what. Either way, as long as I eat something, I’m cool with whatever.

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    • robert s

      actually I am shooting when everyone is eating. we do the rounds for table shots at that time. I ask them “if youd like to do photos with your guests, im ready” and most say yes. so I sit fast, eat and go to the BG and see if they want photos. and if they dont, I go ask the parents. almost ALWAYS im shooting something. people are eating, they stop, get up walk over and they take a picture and go back to eating. no one cares.

      the dancing goes till late and many just fade away and they want pictures beforehand. they dont want to be bothered dancing with their friends to stop the momentum and do pictures, and once it starts, its a long time. group after group move in and I click, its like a train. one after the next.

      usually the time the BG eat are after we do outdoor location shoot and before the guests arrive which around 7:30. but many times I know that the BG never even eat. its happened. not going to happen that I dont get food.

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  25. Mick O’Dwyer

    It depends on the wedding and how many hours we do. We do a mix of short 5-6 hour weddings that run from prep to call-to-meal, and longer 6-12 hour weddings. We’re not fussed if there’s no meal with the short days, though, to be fair, most venues would know us at this stage and ask if we want a complimentary meal after the wedding has been served.

    For longer weddings it’s in our terms and conditions that a meal ought to be provided, and during initial consultations we explain that we don’t expect to be sat at a table with guests – there’s usually a bar or kitchen station where we can grab a bite and still be close. I give Brides and Grooms more credit for recognising that photographers work and carry gear all day long without pause.

    It’s pretty much a non-story, written by some WP hungry for attention with not much to do on someone’s wedding day.

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  26. Ben Perrin

    Everyone will have a different view on this. Personally I have no problem with not being fed at a wedding. My experience has been that usually the vendors get stuffed in some place away from the action and sometimes after the guests eat. I’d prefer to charge a little more and just eat protein bars and whatever else is easy to bring then go out once the wedding has finished. At that stage I’m too tired to cook for myself. It’s a personal thing but I just think I am better value for the client when I eat something small and easy. But I think the gesture of offering the meal is a good one. After all we are human. I think you’d be a good bride to work for Hanssie.

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    • Hanssie

      It doesn’t matter what I eat. I just need to eat. I get HANGRY :)

      I’ve always found that the best time to eat is around when the bride and groom eats. No one wants me taking pictures of them stuffing their faces and the bride and groom are sitting and eating themselves.

      If I ever get married again, my wedding photographer is gonna be pampered like no other now that I know what they go through!

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    • Ben Perrin

      Oh yes, the photographer definitely needs to eat and take a break. And that’s exactly when I like to take a break, when the bride and groom are eating. It’s a stressful day.

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    • Matthew Saville

      Shoot ~500 10+ hr weddings eating nothing but power bars all day, then we’ll talk. ;-)

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    • Ben Perrin

      Oh yeah, totally. Don’t get me wrong, my experience is limited and based on a few 10-13 hour weddings. I did get food as discussed before the event but I had prepared just in case I didn’t get anything. I was more making the point that for me I try to prepare with a small amount of food just in case. I can easily survive on that. I’m completely tired after the event though. I certainly wouldn’t do it for a living.

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    • Ant Motton

      I don’t understand why you’re not eating when the bride and groom are eating!! it’s at least a 2 hour window of opportunity. Don’t tell me you’re taking photos of people eating…. :o My typical day = 9am-4pm *wedding* 4pm-6pm (at least!) wedding breakfast 6pm-10pm evening reception then home….make sure you’re properly hydrated and you’ll be fine… I understand everyone is different and in other countries things happen in various ways but some people are sounding ridiculous…”passing out” lightheaded” weak” I can see this is something that divides us but from my point of view it’s a un-needed expense for the B&G.

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    • robert s

      then your comment is not relevant as a pro. I remember in the beginning assisting and feeling guilty of eating the food. today, I forceed my assistance to eat when they were new. sit your ass down right now and eat. take your 7 minutes, munch something and lets go shoot. thats what I need someone noit giving 100% because theyre tired. and those power/protein bar idea shows you cannot speak for pro photogs who work heavy weddings. heavy, I mean at least 300 guests. and at least 12 hr weddings. it starts from 12-1 and finishes at least at 1. then the drive home afterwards. so when I read posts like yours about the power bars, then I know youre not a veteran wedding photog

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    • robert s

      and if you say 10-13 then I KNOW its more like 3. because if I shot only 10-13 I remember exactly how much it is. when I was new I remembered all my weddings till about 50. then I cant remember them a week later. you are not a seasoned pro and your comment is not relevant to us. I think its disgusting not to let your photog eat. the ones whos your shadow all day. the one who has your best itnerest in mind all day. the only one who gives you something physically for the tons of money u invested. no one will remember the preists ceremony in 3 days. no one will remember what the band even looked like. but the images will stay forever.

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    • Ben Perrin

      Eat a snickers Robert!

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    • Ant Motton

      Your the kind of photographer that all us other photographers snigger at Robert….

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    • Ant Motton

      *You’re* and while I’m at it Robert S, you’re attitude stinks…..I hope to hell that you don’t have the same tone with potential clients, …you don’t come across as professional in any way, shape or form. In fact you come across as a disgrace, an angry bitter, old photographer. Doesn’t matter how good your photos are if you come like a cock womble (that’s not a compliment by the way…) that’s the defining impression you’ll give to you’re client… I can actually imagine you wearing a cape and swishing it around as you finish one of your ridiculous statements…..

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    • Hanssie

      Gentlemen,

      At this point, I feel like it’s a good time to remind everyone that SLR Lounge strives to be a POSITIVE community where we want everyone – staff and readers – to respect each other, value everyone’s opinions, and feel open to share them in a public forum. Please adhere to these guidelines. Thank you! :)

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  27. Mike Glatzer

    It’s in my contract and I’ve never had any couples balk at it. The majority of my weddings have had buffets or stations, and typically the Bride & Groom (even the guests) go, “Have you eaten? Get some food!” The only ones that have had a problem with it were the budget brides and I simply tell them, “If you give me a PB&J sandwich or two, an apple, and a bottle of water then I’m set. Hungry photographers don’t take good pictures.” That usually elicits a laugh and then I get the actual meal anyways. Same argument with prices; state it with confidence and it’ll work out.

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    • Hanssie

      Yes, typically, my brides and grooms are always concerned about making sure I eat and I’m comfy. Funny enough, the only times I’ve ever had an issue (where I didn’t eat until the end of my contract time) was a wedding for a fellow photographer and an expected one from a more demanding bride…

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    • robert s

      exactly. if packed my own lunch and took that out, the BG would laugh or turn an eyebrow and say wtf, and insist I eat the food there. or no one would go to mcdonalds to get food and sit there with others watching them eat that. there are venues that say specifically where to eat or even that the head waiter makes sure the vendors are fed in their own table somewhere in the corner of the hall.we shoot weddings at minimum of 2-300 people and many that are 500+. no one ever told me or any photog I know, pack ur own. thats just some crap thats another trend from the US. you guys need to nip that in the butt right away. I shot a 4 hour bar mitzvah and the mom told me, put the damm cameras aside and eat. I see how hard you work. and its true. we bust our asses and we get fed. its a given. I bond with my clients and the time comes to eat and theyll tell me, pack your own! FUCK THAT. stop with it as fast as possible in the US. u shouldnt feel compliant or awkward or shamed to ask. put it in your contract. this is to the newbies that shoot “7” years already.

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  28. robert s

    click on her page and see that fat pig malone. she talks about not giving food to photographers? she should stop stuffing her fat face. dont give her any food at venues.

    it has never happened that me and my team hasnt been fed in any event I shot. NONE. I dont even deal with the bg (not from the US) the head waiter always makes sure the photogs gets food. its a quick 5-10 thing and were done. I dont want to even think what would happen if the BG said pack ur own lunch. just never happened to any photographer here that I know. never. it would not be on the best interest of the BG and more than that, the BG many times will tell us, go sit and eat. because theyre frikin humane.

    I do know of 2 venues that tried not allowing photographers/dj from eating and it was plastered all over facebook groups and their wall and was made sure to let other potential BG not to close with them. theyve since changed their minds and now do allow. smart move. its the mindset and attitude that photographers carry heavy equipment all day and work in hard conditions and need food. any pro camera and pro 2.8 zoom with flash as combo weighs around 3kg. and im packing 2 of them. add a waist belt with more lenses in the pouches and batteries. we photograph in the blistering heat in the summer dripping tons of sweat from the 80º humidity and freezing cold in the winter outdoors.

    it has never even happened that ANY BG considered telling any photographer pack your own lunch. its a given that we will eat. we work AT LEAST 12 hour weddings. 300-600 guest weddings. no way in hell it would happen. this is something that could only be conjured up in the US. no where else does this crap happen. ridiculous. id spit in your fat face malone if you stood in front of me.

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    • Ant Motton

      well you seem like a bit of an arse….self entitled, as though you’re some one so important. I can happily function on a bowl of cereal first thing before the day starts , eating sandwichs during the wedding breakfast that were made on the morning at home, not once have I collapsed at a wedding in 7 years, you must be a very delicate person. I charge a decent amount for a wedding but not once have I ever thought that b&g should feed me because of who I am….. I’m a vendor and also a grown up that feed my self….

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    • robert s

      from what I see, you are no pro. only a pro who works many years in the field would say, yea, I will get by on cereal and sandwiches. the newbies tread lightly and want to accompany everyone so theyll book them. the kind who arent confident to take big bucks because you said “decent amount” which means, not much, which means, not a high level photog who charge quite some money. ive not heard any photog I have contact with ever have said to them pack your own lunch. and the weddings we shoot enough money that a $30 is no big issue. usually those who are trying to cut where they can are those who are problematic clients anyway who just dont have enough money. if youre ok with eating sandwhiches while everyone around you is eating a nice meal, shows what kind of weddings you shoot, we never had that situation. and im so proud of you that you feed yourself. give yourself a pat on the back. slow down with the attacks and I will as well.

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    • Richard Neal

      Keep in mind that the people around you, eating the nice meal are friends and family of the bride. Unless you are among them (and im talking long term, not the relationship you have struck with them since they booked you) then you should be fine with them eating a nice meal and you eating a sandwich.

      Your a paid vendor, yes photography is important but we arent a guest celebrity, we are there to do a job.

      And it shows what kind of weddings we shoot if we are happy to eat cereal and sandwiches? No it shows what sort of people we are. Huge difference

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    • robert s

      dont be so narrow minded to think that people here are all from the US. people are a bit full of themselves in the US who think theyre the only ones posting on the net. IM not.

      as I said above, not any photog I know or I have ever known, been denied food. there was two venues to try that shit and the photogs shamed that venue through their facebook page. their mind changed quickly when they realized they would lose a lot of potential clients.. we always get food. its a given. even the BG know that we will sit down to eat the same food. not a sandwich or cereal.
      as I said before, the BG dont even deal with this. we sit at seats available at a table away from the center, tell the waiter what we want and were done. if its buffet, then no one even gives a shit youre standing in line to take food. people are humane here and its a given youre going to eat. many always pat me on the back and say, wow, you guys work hard, or geez youre going to be here till late, right?
      they know what we go through. we shoot over 3000 images each. thats a lot of work.

      this is another bullshit thing the US made up. this doesnt happen anywhere but the US. I can imagine in russia the photog having to go to mcdonalds to get his food. its just absurd. only in the US. the land of nonsense bullshit and naivety.

      and fuck that. I dont eat cereal or sandwiches. we work 12 hour weddings at the minimum and im not eating that crap. I actually eat 2-3 times. in the winter we shoot the bg location shoot early because of sunset. and guests are invited at 19:30 so we have at least an hour. we go get something light. at the event we eat at the cocktail time. Im with gear on me and eating with all the guests around me. there are food stations all over and take what we want. no one would ever say to the photog dont eat , pack ur own lunch. thats just absurd.people are humane here and they are more than happy and understand we need to eat. it would never happen. the BG and groom would never tell u. they always tell me, hey did u guys eat?the fact that u dummies accept it in the US shows what bullshit it is. you guys are ridiculous that u accept it.

      oh, and it says ur a sucker or novice that u accept cereal or sandwich to eat. no one here would accept that. SMH

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  29. Andy & Amii Kauth

    Interesting. It’s all about our clients for sure, but it’s in our contract. And we only do all day coverage. Not a deal breaker for us in any respect, and we’ve never had a client make a deal about it. We also don’t make a big deal about it and eat quickly … And despite our healthy eating habits, we’re not unknown for accepting left over desert … Heck. We’d trade ’em out a meal for cake if it’s good cake :)

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    • Hanssie

      I actually never eat the wedding cake – I should put that in my contract that I need cake!! One of my brides insisted I drink a toast with her and her bridesmaids, though. That was fun.

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