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Tips & Tricks

The Brenizer Method Creates Bokeh You Won’t Believe!

By Leo Hoang on May 3rd 2012

There has been a lot of talk amongst the Photography community about the ‘Brenizer Method’.

Ryan Brenizer is a New York based Photographer, predominantly shooting Weddings, but has also been commissioned for covering the likes of President Obama and Muhammad Ali, and he has developed a method which has been dubbed the ‘Brenizer Method’.

The ‘Brenizer Method’ has been developed to enhance the field of view (showing wider angles), whilst keeping your depth of field intact to create some beautiful wide angle images with incredibly shallow depth of fields.

There are limitations to what we can capture with our cameras and lenses, and for wider shots, wide angle lenses tend to increase our depth of field. So what Ryan Brenizer has done, he has incorporated Photo-Stitching into his Photography, and has stitched up images to maintain the shallow depth of field, whilst attaining the desired field of view. The results are simply stunning!

Click here to see more examples from the man himself!

About

Leo Hoang is a professional photographer based in London who shoots Weddings, Events and Real-Estate.

Q&A Discussions

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  1. Ed Rhodes

    love this look

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  2. jorge

    Where do you lock the focus for this kind of shot? Do you lock focus on the subject and then shoot around. or do you continually focus on the background as you shoot around the subject?

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  3. Bruce Williams

    Does he use focus lock, to lock the focus for the off subject shots?

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  4. John W Smith

    Would have been more useful had they addressed how he manipulates the focus. Are all the individual images done with manual focus on the main subject?? Never addressed, but probably the most important part of the technique.

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  5. Von Wong Taking Things To The Extreme! Brenizer Method 400mm f/2.8 Free Photography Tips Tutorials Reviews and Wordpress Themes | Photography tips and photography tutorials and more

    […] Von Wong is known for pushing the limits in Photography. In this video he uses the Brenizer Method with a 400mm f/2.8 lens. I am a big fan of Ryan Brenizer’s work, and I myself have mimicked the […]

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  6. jonathan bae

    would have been nice to see a side-by-side comparison to see just how much of a shallower depth of field you get.  good info nonetheless.  thx.

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  7. Greg Henry

    I was too distracted by the photographer’s sign language to “get it”.  The host seemed about as interested. But more power to him… he’s obviously doing well with the technique.

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  8. Tom

    Thank you so much.  I have seen a lot of Ryan’s work and have found he has such amazing talent.  Again, thank you for sharing.

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  9. Anonymous

    Its really nothing new. People have been stitching pictures together for ages. Of course we have to put a special name on it right? Now all photo stitches are considered “Brenzier” methods haha.  He is just known for using photo stitching techniques. Oh wait, I’m suppose to call it the “Brenzier” technique now. I better find some photo technique and put my name on it. lol  He is a great photographer on his own rights/merits and stands out for thinking out side of the box.

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  10. Anonymous

    Its really nothing new. People have been stitching pictures together for ages. Of course we have to put a special name on it right? Now all photo stitches are considered “Brenzier” methods haha.  He is just known for using photo stitching techniques. Oh wait, I’m suppose to call it the “Brenzier” technique now. I better find some photo technique and put my name on it. lol  He is a great photographer on his own rights/merits and stands out for thinking out side of the box.

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  11. Anonymous

    I guess it’s not really a practical method, but how about shooting in large format? Have no experience with that, but I can imagine you can get some pretty shallow DOF on wider shots with a relatively fast lens.

    But honestly, I don’t really like the look of those images, and think bokeh has become totally cliche and overused. You sacrifice good composition for that pretty blur. Those images would look a lot nicer and more intimate if it were shot close up.

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  12. Norman S.

    Why not use a 24mm 1.4 lens?  This is a helpful tip if you don’t have nice glass, but for pros, which this guy supposedly is, he should just buy a better lens. There is nothing shown here that my lens can’t do on it’s own.

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  13. Norman S.

    Why not use a 24mm 1.4 lens?  This is a helpful tip if you don’t have nice glass, but for pros, which this guy supposedly is, he should just buy a better lens. There is nothing shown here that my lens can’t do on it’s own.

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    • Bastien Chong

      The 24mm 1.4 is great, but no way you can have that kind of dramatic effect done with a longer wide lense.

      BTW, look at the left foot ;)

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    • Pye

      Norman, this effect is actually not possible to pull off. A wide angle lens would need to have a wide open aperture of around .4 – .6 to get this amount of Bokeh in the background. Wide pro lenses only go down to around 1.2, and you don’t get nearly the same amount of bokeh in the shot. 

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    • Gi

      clearly u dont know about brenizer method

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    • sean

      The brenizer method defies physics lol it can give you an equivalent aperture of 0.6. Please link me to your lens that can shoot that wide :)

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    • Billy Paragon Mangino

      I was thinking the same thing. I missing point is basically to create an image that’s very large and very sharp. From my point of view this would be fantastic to shoot for large format print to create a simulated extreme megapixel rating. And that added detail even when displayed smaller on web creates an extremely sharp look on the focused areas making the background areas very  soft in comparison.

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    • Marokero

      I use a 24/1.4 on a D3 and this can’t be done – the shallow depth of field at such a distance. Only if the subject was very close to the lens, which would then be a close up, not what is shown here. I will be trying this at my next wedding :)

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