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Syrp’s New Variable ND Filter Is Now Available

By Anthony Thurston on July 22nd 2014

Syrp has been a Kickstarter success story if there ever was one. Ever since the successful funding of the Genie, the company has taken steps to expand. Recently, the company added their Magic Carpet slider to their product pool, and today, I am happy to announce that their Variable ND filter is now available as well.

syrp-variable-n1

The variable ND filter lets you prevent 1 to 8.5 stops of light from entering your lens, allowing for faster apertures and shallower depth of field in bright conditions. The Syrp ND Filter is available in a small 67mm filter size and a larger 82mm filter size, and both come with a lens cleaning cloth and step-up up rings included. The filter also comes in a spiffy zip up leather pouch.

[REWIND: Syrp Announces New Magic Carpet Slider]

Syrp Variable ND Filter Specs

syrp-variable-nd

  • Smooth sliding action of front ring for seamless exposure transitions.
  • Provides exposure reduction of 1 Stop (ND2) to 8.5 Stops (ND400) of light.
  • Special glass coating made in Japan to help prevent flare, as well as scratches and oily fingerprints.
  • Neutral color temperature that will not affect the colors in your image.
  • Solid aluminum and glass construction.
  • Designed to fit your regular lens cap
  • Includes Genuine leather case
  • Includes 2 step-up rings to fit all your lenses

This is a high quality filter and comes with a lot of extras that many other filters do not come with. The Syrp Variable ND filter also isn’t exactly for the budget conscious, but is far from the most expensive Variable ND out there, too.

The Syrp Variable ND starts at $139 for the 62mm size, and goes up to $189 for the 82mm size. If you are interested in learning more about the Syrp ND Filter (or any of their products) or maybe you want to purchase one, you can head over to their website here for all the details.

Anthony Thurston is a photographer based in the Salem, Oregon area specializing in Boudoir. He recently started a new project, Fiercely Boudoir to help support the growing boudoir community. Find him over on Instagram. You may also connect with him via Email.

19 Comments

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  1. Chuck Eggen

    Yet something else I want.

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  2. Karl-Filip Karlsson

    When do i gona se the test?

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  3. Andy O’Dowd

    Damn it! Another kickstarter I missed…:-(

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  4. Greg Faulkner

    Thats the Louis Vuitton of filter pouches lol

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  5. Herm Tjioe

    My Fader ND gets more usage than I had originally anticipated. It’s a much welcome addition for both still and video shooting. So recently I purchased a Tiffen version for the smaller diameter lenses with corresponding lens cap. Frankly it’s a must have item in your carry bag.

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    • Phil Bautista

      I feel the same way except I got an 86mm for my Bigma and a set of step up rings so I can use my other lenses with it. I’m not that pleased with the greenish tint in my photos but that tint isn’t present in the videos. I haven’t tried the Tiffen yet.

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    • Herm Tjioe

      One reason why I chose not to use many step ups is the task of changing and keeping track where each ring gets stored and with which lens it can work with. It’s far easier for me to have a VariND filter for each of my main go-to lenses. Outdoor shoots became much less complicated.

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    • Phil Bautista

      Any comment on the difference of the Tiffen and Fader filters with stills and video? Is the price difference worth it?

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    • Herm Tjioe

      I haven’t had the time to consider comparing between the two. You are right about the lack of perceptible greenish hue when in video mode. Perhaps I had the rotation set at a different level than the still images. The recent post about the ND filters here:

      https://www.slrlounge.com/favorite-neutral-density-filters/

      saw the changes at different stopping powers. But if my memory served me proper, during the adjusting at video shoots I didn’t notice the green tinge.

      I haven’t used the Tiffen enough to render some early opinions yet. The Tiffen was priced far lower, it was a going out of business sale.

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  6. Stephen Velasquez

    I will neveR purchase a variable ND filter again because of the x band you get when using it to the max.

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    • Phil Bautista

      You don’t have to set it to the max if you want to avoid the x band. It also doesn’t appear when shooting video. I understand the disappointment when you can’t get full utility out of a tool but that doesn’t make it completely useless. In fact, what you’re left with is actually still very useful.

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  7. Phil Bautista

    I have a Bigma which has an 86mm diameter and I know the OS version has a 96mm filter. Would’ve been nice for the big glass to get some love.

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  8. Bokeh Monk

    I find it hard to take this item seriously, no 77mm Ø !

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    • Anthony Thurston

      would be what the included step up rings are for…

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    • Michael Chapman

      Anthony is exactly right. You purchase a larger filter (for your largest diameter lens) and buy the inexpensive step-downs for your smaller diameter lenses, because that way you get coverage.

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    • MARTIN MIANO

      Great replies both Anthony and Michael

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    • MARTIN MIANO

      They seem really cool to me and the price aint too bad since its a variable ND filter

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  9. Ken Yee

    Would have been nice to have a comparison w/ other good ND filters…

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