Photographing the Milky Way

Your content will be up shortly. Please allow up to 5 seconds
Gear Announcements

Speedlight/Trigger Issues On D750 Caused By New Hotshoe Dimensions

By Anthony Thurston on May 7th 2015

Chinese speedlight and trigger maker Phottix has just issued a release regarding issues with Nikon’s wildly popular D750. The issue revolves around the dimensions of the hotshoe, which has been causing problems for lots of speedlights and triggers – not just Phottix models.

D700-and-D750-575x628

D700 (top) and D750 (bottom) Hotshoe comparison provided by Phottix

According to the Phottix press release, the issue is caused by the length on the D750 hotshoe being slightly longer than most standard hot shoes, which in turn, causes many speedlights and triggers to not line up correctly with the pins, and thus they either do not fire, or do not fire reliably.

Due to this issue, Phottix says that there is really nothing they can do – short of releasing D750 specific products (which let’s be real, is really not an option). So the blame here lies with Nikon, whose own ¬†speedlights are even known to be having issues with the D750 at times.

But fear not, Phottix says that a DIY fix is possible. Simply get a sliver of cardboard and slide it in front of your speedlight/hotshoe. This will allow for the triggers and speedlights to correctly line up with the D750 hotshoe connectors.

You can read the full Phottix press release here.

What are your thoughts on this release from Phottix? Do you think Nikon should ‘fix’ the D750 hotshoe issue? Do you think this was done on purpose to cause issues for third party products? Leave a comment below and let us know what you think!

[via Phottix]

Anthony Thurston is a photographer based in the Salem, Oregon area specializing in Boudoir. He recently started a new project, Fiercely Boudoir to help support the growing boudoir community. Find him over on Instagram. You may also connect with him via Email.

Q&A Discussions

Please or register to post a comment.

  1. Jesper Ek

    I use a Dörr TTL and another one without any problems.

    | |
  2. Sean Tatalovich

    I have even read the maybe nikon did it on purpose because of the all the cheap competition. I put nothing past big business.

    | |
  3. Sean Tatalovich

    I have a D750 and already complained twice to Nikon. I think Nikon should fix it. I have read way too maniple having problems with Profoto, Phottix, Godox. I couldn’t get a good connection I bought a Pixel TF-322 Flash Hot Shoe Sync Adapter which was recommended and it has helped. I am waiting to see what nikon comes up with down the line I need 1/8000 shutter speed and I know that the D810 has no issues.

    | |
  4. Ed Rhodes

    interesting. i wonder if nikon will opine on this at all?

    | |
  5. paul hayes

    I have a d750 and have not had any problems using sb800 flash.

    | |
  6. Richard Bremer

    Too bad Nikon didn’t send out a press release about this issue. I don’t understand how this problem came into existence, as hotshoes have had the same dimensions for years. Let’s see if Nikon will be offering a solution. In the meantime, I will be enjoying my D750 as much as possible, as it is a great camera :)

    | |
  7. Jason Trayer

    I need to try the D750 out. I think I want it but I have not shot with it yet. I do use Phottix triggers. This could be a good test.

    | |
  8. DeOren Robinson

    Thank-you for the article. The D750 is a must-have for me.

    | |
  9. Mathieu F

    I have two d750 and not experienced any problem with one SB-700.
    I think it’s a case of a 5% error margin on each side Phottix shoe plate being shorter and the D750 hot shoe being longer.

    | |
    • Rafael Steffen

      I hope that is the only problem.

      | |
    • Mathieu F

      Just to give an update for those following this thread:
      I have just tested 3 Phottix Mitros+ in TTL and not experienced any problem.
      Could someone explain what their problem is? Is the flash not triggering at all manual/ttl?

      | |
  10. Rob Harris

    A D750 is on my wish list. Will certainly keep my eye on this issue. Thanks for passing along the info.

    | |
    • Thomas Horton

      I don’t think you could go wrong with the D750. It has so many good things going for it.

      | |
    • Rafael Steffen

      It’s on my wish list also. It is a faster camera and delivers great image quality and costs 1000 less than the D810.

      | |
  11. Thomas Horton

    I guess QC is one of the areas upper management cuts to keep profits up. We are seeing that with Nikon and Canon.

    This is one reason why I like to wait before buying new technology items. It sometimes feels like the companies are using us as beta testers…. and charging us a premium price to boot!

    No thanks.

    | |
    • adam sanford

      Perhaps this was deliberate — are Nikon flashes having a problem? Is there enough difference between the Nikon and Phottix flash mounts that Nikon could have deliberately thrown a little gap in just to spite the 3rd party functionality?

      I’m assuming not, as I’d be stunned if a third party hadn’t 100% reverse-engineered something hardware oriented, but I suppose it’s possible.

      | |
    • Thomas Horton

      From what I have read, even some of the Nikon SB flashes are having issues.

      It looks like the hot shoe on the 750 is a bit different than on other Nikon cameras. I wonder if they got them from a different vendor. I doubt that Nikon makes hot shoes. They probably buy them from a sub contractor.

      | |
    • Dustin Baugh

      I doubt it was really so bad as that. More likely somebody making the mold for the camera body didn’t think 1/4 of a mm of difference would be a big deal. They popped ina flash and it worked for them that one time. They didn’t get the amount of man-hours to see that there is an occasional issue.

      | |
  12. adam sanford

    I keep hearing the D750 is selling like hotcakes — do we have any numbers on that? I don’t doubt it so much as I’m curious as to what the numbers are vs. competition, versus the D610, D810, etc.

    | |
[i]
[i]