Photographing the Milky Way

Your content will be up shortly. Please allow up to 5 seconds
Gear Rumors

Next High End Sony APS-C E-Mount Camera To Feature 5-Axis Stabilization

By Anthony Thurston on January 14th 2015

Sony blew us all away with the A7 MkII and its 5-axis stabilization built right into the body. Not only did Sony have a killer full frame camera, but they instantly gave their users stabilization no matter what their lens choice was, be it vintage or some other manufacturer.

sony-a7II-front

[REWIND: Sony A7 MK II Unboxing & Initial Thoughts]

According to the latest rumors, that great technology could be coming to Sony’s next high end APS-C body as well. The name of the camera is not known, but according to the source, it will be above the very popular Sony A6000, leading to speculation it could be the A7000.

Regardless, I think that this is pretty-much a no brainer for Sony. As I mentioned above, it instantly gives users of that camera stabilization no matter where they are or what their lens choice is, and that is a powerful feature to have access to.

As for specs or anything like that, there is nothing at this point. But if the rumor is correct, this new camera would be available by mid-2015. So announcements could come at any time over the next couple of months. Stay tuned!

What are your thoughts on this 5-axis technology that Sony could start putting in everything? Do you agree with me that it is a no brainer, or do you prefer lens stabilization? Leave a comment below!

[via Sony Alpha Rumors]

Anthony Thurston is a photographer based in the Salem, Oregon area specializing in Boudoir. He recently started a new project, Fiercely Boudoir to help support the growing boudoir community. Find him over on Instagram. You may also connect with him via Email.

Q&A Discussions

Please or register to post a comment.

  1. Phil Bautista

    The IBS is a great addition because many mirrorless shooters use legacy glass which don’t have stabilization. Here’s hoping they also focus on improving audio recording in-camera instead of having to buy accessories to make it happen.

    | |
  2. Phil Bautista

    I own 3 mirrorless cameras – Nikon1 AW1, Panasonic GF2 and Sony a6000. They all share 1 trait – bottom loading SD card in the same compartment as the battery. That sort of setup makes it difficult to access the card with a grip attached which is why a grip has never been an accessory I’ve even thought of getting. Besides, one of the reasons I’m moving away from DSLRs and into mirrorless systems is the size and weight factor. Battery grips would be counter intuitive for me.

    | |
    • Matthew Saville

      Yeah, it was a real show-stopper for me to have to remove my tripod plate from the Fuji X100T just to change the battery or memory card. The A6000 came close to being as annoying, too, and I really hope they reconsider this design. There’s gotta be a better way!

      =Matt=

      | |
  3. Arnold Ziffel

    I guess this is a big deal…..unless you’re a Pentax shooter ;-)

    | |
    • Hannu Siika-aho

      I have been a Pentax and NEX shooter and must say that as long as Pentax doesn’t get serious about mirror-less this will be a big deal.

      Flange focus distance of Pentax DSLR being 45.46mm makes impossible (without reducing the image quality) the the use of all Minolta/Konica/Sony A, Practica B, Canon EF(-S), Minolta SR (MC/MD), Canon FD, Konica AR, Olympus 4/3, Nikon S, Contax G, M39 (Leica) and Leica M mount lenses on Pentax DSLR!

      With IS in body, all above lenses and also M42, Pentax-K and basically all vintage lenses could be adapted (and stabilized) easily to Sony NEX mount, which has a flange distance 18mm only!

      | |
    • Arnold Ziffel

      I’m not comparing the two…I’m just saying that Pentax users are used to having IBS on every camera body. I mainly shoot Canon, but still pick up whatever flagship Pentax puts out, just because I like them. And until I got my 7DII, the K-3 was the stuff as far as APS-C cameras were concerned and in some ways still is, specifically dynamic range and high ISO shooting.

      | |
    • Matthew Saville

      Yeah Arnold, depending on what you shoot, the Pentax K-3 still beats the snot out of the 7D mk2. I’d only pick a 7D 2 if telephoto AF was a huge part of what I do, and/or low-light journalism and portraiture. For everything else, the K-3 kills it!

      | |
    • Arnold Ziffel

      Yup, the K-3 is a highly underrated piece and while I love my Pentax limited primes, there just isn’t much to pick from in the way of fast lenses. Especially tele zooms.

      | |
  4. David Blanchard

    I got my fingers crossed. I love my NEX-7, but would like some of the painful bits refined and /or eliminated. Yeah, a removable grip would be really handy at times. Of course, WiFi is kind of a given. I bought a NEX-5T for this feature and for real nimbleness, I bought a RX100M3 when I was recently in China. Both are quite nice. I guess I’m on the Sony train. Anyone want a 7D kit? :-)

    | |
  5. Austin Swenson

    I think this resonates with the pattern they usually have with a low, mid, and higher end series of cameras in whatever they make, and it’ll probably come out soon and be the rage for a minute, but I just hope it’s gonna be a great portrait camera along with a good wildlife and sports camera that tracks well, has a good fps rate, etc.

    In fact I think this would be my next body when I buy one.

    | |
  6. Matthew Saville

    I’d love to see Sony simply get their act together with regards to RAW image quality, and match the high ISO noise / low ISO dynamic range that is coming from Nikon’s version of the 24 MP DX sensor in bodies like the D3300 and D5300.

    As a landscape / adventure / astro-landscape photographer I don’t care as much about in-body stabilization, but it would be nice to have for general shooting. I’m still shocked that they thought they could get away with the same dinky little battery in the A7 mk2 considering the in-body stabilization. It’s a shame that Sony is missing the mark on one of the main advantages that the mirrorless system has to offer; portability and compactness. Maybe I’ll just resign myself to getting a battery grip for the A6000 / A7000, if they make one yet…

    | |
    • Austin Swenson

      Don’t I just wish those smaller ones had grips, that would be awesome.

      | |
    • John Cavan

      For astro work consider Pentax. The Pentax O-GPS unit offers the ability to shift the sensor based on the rotation of the earth for as much as 5 minutes depending on location and time of year. This is a pretty slick feature for in-body stabilization that you’re just not going to get on a lens and may be the single biggest thing I miss in my move from Pentax to Nikon (aside from the stellar ergonomics). All in all, I think it’s probably more up your alley then you realized. :)

      | |
    • John Cavan

      @Matthew – Then you should know better than to claim that you don’t care as much about in-body stabilization! :p

      As an aside, as EVF systems improve significantly, the advantage if in-body stabilization is really, really, going to show itself over the lens-based system. Historically, the single biggest advantage of the lens-based system was the stabilization in the optical viewfinder, but that goes poof if the viewfinder is electronic and becomes stabilized even for ancient M42 lenses.

      It may have taken awhile, but ultimately, I think Pentax and Sony made the right choice staying with the stabilization feature in the body. They’re poised to leapfrog Canon and Nikon with this.

      | |
[i]
[i]