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17 Jan 2022

HDR Photography

RECENT POSTS IN HDR Photography

HDR Photography

2 Reasons to Choose DSLRs with Faster Frame Rates for HDR Photography – From the HDR Photography Workshop Series

In a previous article, we discussed the difference between ghosting and motion blur in HDR photography. In this article, we will discuss how a DSLR with a faster frame rate can significantly help reduce ghosting in your HDR images. In addition, a DSLR with a faster frame rate is also incredibly useful in scenes where you cannot use a tripod. The frame rate of your DSLR will have an overall impact on your HDR images. If you are serious about HDR photography and are looking to buy or upgrade to a new DSLR, these 2 reasons should be taken into consideration when purchasing a new DSLR.

HDR Photography

Motion Blur vs. Ghosting: The Difference between These 2 Artifacts – From the HDR Photography Workshop Series

In HDR photography, we are usually taking bracketed sequences to create the final HDR image. Since bracketing involves multiple consecutive shots, any moving objects in your scene will be moving across each bracketed image, a common artifact in HDR photography known as ghosting. Do not confuse ghosting with motion blur as motion blur and ghosting are two different artifacts created by two different pieces of the overall HDR process. In this article, we will explain the difference is between motion blur and ghosting in HDR photography.

HDR Photography

Reasons Why You Should Shoot HDR Images at the Lowest Native ISO Setting – From the HDR Photography Workshop Series

In previous tutorials, we discussed what the optimal shutter speed and aperture setting should be when we are shooting HDR photography. Now, we are going to discuss the optimal ISO setting. In HDR photography, we are combing multiple exposures to create one final HDR image. This process of combining exposures automatically creates certain challenges, one being the overall grain in the final HDR image. When you shoot at your camera’s lowest native ISO, you will still see a little bit of grain in your images. Because of this, always keep your ISO at the lowest native ISO on your camera whenever possible. For Canon users, the lowest native ISO is 100. For Nikon users, the lowest native ISO is around 160. In this article, we will discuss reasons why the optimal ISO setting in HDR photography is the lowest native ISO on your camera. In addition, we will also explain what native ISO means.

HDR Photography

What is the Optimal Aperture Setting in HDR Photography? – From the HDR Photography Workshop Series

In a previous article, we talked about what the optimal shutter speed is when shooting HDR photography. Now, we are going to discuss the optimal aperture setting in HDR photography. When shooting HDR images, we want to capture as much detail as possible. Each camera lens will have an aperture “sweet spot,” where you can get the most detail and sharpness. However, the lens’s “sweet spot” may not always be the optimal aperture setting when shooting HDR images. In this article, we will discuss what exactly a “sweet spot” is, as well as the general rule of thumb for the optimal aperture setting when shooting HDR photography.

Photoshop

How To Create An HDR Image Using Simple Photoshop Layering

Most of today’s latest and greatest cameras have incredible amounts of dynamic range, however that doesn’t mean you should just go blasting away at your shadows with recovery sliders and brushes. The best image quality from a camera still comes from proper exposures. So if you have a scene that is almost manageable within a single capture, but you’d still like to reduce noise in shadow areas or improve your highlight preservation, you can do so without having to set up more than just two photos with separate exposures.