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Lovers Dance All Night for Long Exposure Timelapse

By Jules Ebe on October 18th 2013

What happens to lovers while they are sleeping? Is it just sleeping next to each other, each on his own, or is there a sharing of certain places or emotions?

© Paul Schneggenburger

© Paul Schneggenburger

A series started as a grad project in 2010 has morphed into an ongoing affair for Dutch photographer Paul Schneggenburger. ‘The Sleep of the Beloved’ is a series of photographs consisting of volunteer couples, and even families, sleeping in a black-sheeted bed in his studio, with a 6-hour-long exposure.

At no point in the exposure am I in the room myself. I just light the candles and set up the stage.

The unconscious interactions are mesmerizing, and like the relationships, no two are exactly alike. Some are intertwined all night, while others seem to shift and dance across the surface, leaving only a ghost of the moment they were there.

[rewind: Love is Sexy – Friday Foto Funnies]  

The Sleep of the Beloved

© Paul Schneggenburger

© Paul Schneggenburger

© Paul Schneggenburger

© Paul Schneggenburger

© Paul Schneggenburger

© Paul Schneggenburger

© Paul Schneggenburger

© Paul Schneggenburger

© Paul Schneggenburger

© Paul Schneggenburger

Keep in mind these are not composites, but a single long exposure. The ethereal effect is quite graceful – definitely not something I would equate my own sleeping patterns with.

If you would like to see more, or would like to volunteer to be a part of this project, check out Paul Schneggenburger’s website here.

Until Next Time . . .

Stay Inspired ~ Jules

Image credit: Paul Schneggenburger

[via Daily Mail]

About

is a Southern California based Conceptual Artist and Photographer. Her work has been featured in several print publications and selections can be seen in local gallery exhibitions. Connect with her on Facebook and Google+.

2 Comments

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  1. Ryan

    Interesting concept, I’d be very curious to learn more about his technique, I’m assuming he is using film. I suspect a 6 hour exposure on a digital sensor in bulb mode wouldn’t go so well. Also I’m impressed that he was able to get good exposures of them all. Does he fire a strobe or some sort of dull light throughout the night to capture where they are at a certain moment?

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  2. Justin Lin

    Very creative!

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