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DXO One Gets Big Update | Adding An Android Model, Better FB Live Integration, & Battery Pack

By Kishore Sawh on October 16th 2017

We have repeatedly sung praise in the direction of the DXO One for about two years now, since its launch, and happy to say it looks better now than ever. DXO has launched an update for the DXO App which brings a bevy of functionality updates, finally made a version compatible with Android, and they’ve also launched some accessories.

Perhaps this biggest news about the DXO One at the moment is that it’s finally available for Android, so in place of a lightning connector there will be a USB-C connector. This means that only newer models of phones will be compatible, but USBC is the way the industry seems to be going, and Android users will have a few weeks before this version goes live.

[DXO ONE REVIEW: DxO One Review | Weaponizing The iPhone Chassis With A Proper Camera]

In addition to this revelation we were made aware that DXO has updated the accessories list and added new features. The most important accessory being a battery grip with which you can extend the life of your shoot for two hours, and the new feature of note is the ready-to-share timelapse video function. With auto-ramping to avoid flicker and the ability to shoot raw and produce 4K timelapses the DxO is even more flexible, and the videos are, as suggested, ready to share.

Last December DXO released a host of updates which included multi-cam Facebook Live functionality and brought WiFi to new units, as well as dropped the price by 20% permanently. The new app update sees to it the total multi-cam functionality is achieved.

“Its revolutionary Multi-Camera mode, which leverages the DxO ONE and both iPhone cameras, gives users the ability to experiment with shots that can’t be captured with the iPhone’s cameras alone, making it easy to create professional-quality video streams.”

DxO ONE’s Live Facebook solution offers a set of advanced controls, including a mini-control panel that allows the user to preview all three views to compose shots, adjust lighting, or prepare the subject before shooting and streaming live from different angles. Just like filmmakers, users can switch from one camera to another at the touch of a fingertip, as well as record sound from the DxO ONE’s or the iPhone’s built-in microphone, and switch the sound source during playback.” – press release

The benefit of this should be relatively obvious if you’re someone who uses FB Live. As many more creatives are realizing that video is given much higher preference in regards to Facebook’s organic reach FB Live is being more widely adopted, and this will make yours stand out.

The price for the battery pack is $50 and the price of the DXO has remained unchanged at $469. Is it cheap? No, and it’s generally considered a premium product, but you can read our review here and why we think it’s worth it. For one, it’ll do better than your iPhone 8…

 

About

Kishore is, among other things, the Editor-In-Chief at SLR Lounge. A photographer and writer based in Miami, he can often be found at dog parks, and airports in London and Toronto. He is also a tremendous fan of flossing and the happiest guy around when the company’s good.

4 Comments

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  1. adam sanford

    Neat technology — I agree everyone should check it out.

    But remember who is designing, testing and marketing this thing:  DXO, which I believe is latin for ‘Trust us because we said so.’

    “As with any other camera, the DxOMark team has fully evaluated the ONE in objective laboratory tests and will be as transparent as possible regarding the science and implementation that enable DxO ONE to achieve a score of 85, one stop better than the best one-inch sensor so far.”

    They argue this rig can deliver FF results based on the back of a multi-shot composite mode that effectively requires a tripod and stationary subjects — yes, for a cell phone attached apparatus.  Yet for some reason, other cameras with multi-shot high-detail composite modes are only scored on how their single frames look.  Except for this camera.  Because DXO made it and wants to sell it.

    Sadly, they don’t need to resort to these reputation-robbing antics.  It’s a nice product they’ve made.  The real performance of this thing is more in line with the RX100 series — no slouch at all — but they have decided to wow folks with special scoring just for their product to make it look better.  It’s a sad (but consistent) reflection of how they do business.

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    • Kishore Sawh

      Adam, I’m not coming at this from an angle of their scoring system, simply on how well it works in the real world; how surprising it is that you find yourself using it more than you think, and it still, without multi-shot, delivers far superior quality to any phone out there.

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    • adam sanford

      That’s what bums me out — it’s a good idea for a product.  Sell it for what it will do in real use and I’d honestly consider it.  It’s a really small RX100 with direct phone integration.

      (Sorry for the double post — I made an typo correction and now there are two post.  Can’t delete either for some reason.)

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  2. adam sanford

    Neat technology — I agree everyone should check it out.

    But remember who is designing, testing and marketing this thing:  DXO, which I believe is latin for ‘Trust us because we said so.’

    “As with any other camera, the DxOMark team has fully evaluated the ONE in objective laboratory tests and will be as transparent as possible regarding the science and implementation that enable DxO ONE to achieve a score of 85, one stop better than the best one-inch sensor so far.”

    They argue this rig can deliver FF results based on the back of a multi-shot composite mode that effectively requires a tripod and stationary subjects — yes, for a cell phone attached apparatus.  Yet for some reason, other cameras with multi-shot high-detail composite modes are only scored on how their single frames look.  Except for this camera.  Because DXO made it and want to sell it.

    Sadly, they don’t need to resort to these reputation-robbing antics.  It’s a nice product they’ve made.  The real performance of this thing is more in line with the RX100 series — no slouch at all — but they have decided to wow folks with special scoring just for their product to make it look better.  It’s a sad (but consistent) reflection of how they do business.

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