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Nikon D750 Review | It’s Achilles, Less His Heel

By Kishore Sawh on December 16th 2014

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When people let themselves go a bit, or crest the hill of middle age and begin the unrelenting slope to physical demise, there are a myriad of things that can be done to soften the blow and re-incentivize their target market, even with younger attractive versions around. Tummies ravaged by pregnancy can be vacuumed and re-upholstered; breasts betrayed by gravity can be exhumed, larger than in life; and a head as barren as a college dorm fridge, can be replanted. If only it were so easy for brands to re-incentivize camera consumers.

The older camera manufacturers have really had their work cut out because there is no shortage of options for anyone looking to get into photography now, on any level, so the arms race to be relevant is visceral, and it seems as though the marketing boys are always pushing out new ‘2.0’ models in an effort to capture or keep your attention. Nikon, arguably has been leading the pack with this, offering 2 versions to almost all their DSLRs. But how much different can they be? Really, it can seem as though they just shuffle internal furniture around and slap a ’10′ on the moniker.

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In the realm of full frame, of which Nikon has an impressive 5 offerings, we saw it with the D600, an excellent camera all round. It heralded a new level of incentive, was a departure for the company and many were sold, but, like a teenager, it was pre-mature and had issues with spots. So a ‘new’ camera was launched, the D610, which was really the camera the D600 was meant to be. It was much the same of the D800/E that evolved into the D810 – again, a classic afterthought, and really, while the 610 and 810 are brilliant in their own rights, they were sort of a stiff apology from Nikon that you had to pay for – and a stiff apology is a second insult.

So what exactly is Nikon doing with the oddly positioned, and oddly numbered, D750? Surely they couldn’t be apologizing for the D700, a cult icon in its own right. Is this its successor? The answer to that is no, but it’s also the wrong question. The D700 was brilliant for its time, but its time has passed.

But what the Lord hath taken away the Lord handeth back, in black. It may mirror the D610 when looking at it, and the D810 when looking through it, but this FrankenNikon is not really a camera just to fill the gap. It’s taken them both and splashed the Styx over the parts mother Achilles missed. There is no heel.

04-performance-5-stars

It is a gem, a genuine gem that will surprise you. Let me clarify, regardless of your experience, or what you shoot with, the D750 will surprise you. Using it is like being set-up with a date your friends told you was amazing, but you couldn’t see it, only to find out mid-way through the evening that you’ve been subconsciously contemplating marriage since the first ten minutes.

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ISO 2500, 85mm f/2, 1/25

Image Quality

The D750 is better compared to the D810 and D4s than to the D610. Sure they share pretty much the same sensor so the image quality should be the same (the D610 produces stunning images), but it’s how it gets there. Fair to say that the current line-up of Nikon FX cameras have IQs in the mid-triple digits, and render beautiful images from sharpness, to dynamic range, color, and so forth. If you shoot any of their cameras now and end up with poor images, it’s time to pause and reflect on your ability.

[REWIND: Nikon D610 Review | To Get Or Not To Get, Is Still The Question]

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And while there’s a lot of talk about the D810 providing superior image quality to anything else in the Nikon line-up, I would say that’s a matter of definition, and to some degree, opinion. If it’s the lack of AA filter and the bounty of megapixels that provide a crop ability and resolution ‘advantage,’ that makes you think it’s the better one, that probably pertains to what you shoot, and how.

Most who will buy these cameras now understand that 24MP is more than enough for 99% of work, and a shooter that knows what they’re doing will generally have no need for the massive files from the D810. And yes, I can hear some of you shouting the D810 will shoot about 35MB RAW files in the 12- bit compressed mode, but still…

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ISO 200, 85mm f/2, 1/250

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Detail brought through by bringing up exposure 4 stops.

The D750 does incredibly well in low light, and that ability (more on that to come) has much to do with the breadth of its dynamic range. Even at ISOs pushing significantly pass 5000, there was no real noticeable banding, blotches, or chroma noise. In my use of both cameras, the D750 bests the D810 in high ISO use – and no doubt the massive pixel count of the D810 has something to do with it, but it’s still worth mentioning for those of you shooting events, or weddings especially. It’s so good in this department, that it allows for a level of editability with the RAW files that’s just remarkable (refer to two images above), and that allows you to push higher ISO, faster shutter speeds, and gives you more confidence in your shooting environment.

What does this translate to? It means the D750 will take you further than you expect, and allow you to push the boundaries of your shooting environments and creativity. The image quality is almost as impressive as its autofocus.

Autofocus – Clever as a fox

It’s important to understand that autofocus is a pillar of modern professional camera performance, and it’s simple to see why. We are pushing cameras in environments so harsh, using such fast glass, with carpaccio-thin focus, that we are relying on them to do a lot of work on our behalf, and one that works better, will not let a decisive moment slip by. When this is considered, taking into account that the D750 focuses down to EV -3 vs -2 in the D810 and D4s, it puts this camera in a league of its own. And it is, in a league of its own.

I could go on and on about how good it is, so I will…

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The autofocus on the D750 is the dream Nikon sold to us, and we want more time in bed. The Multi-CAM 3500 II autofocus module is essentially an updated variant of the AF found in the D810, and there are no flies on that. It has the same 51 AF points that nail focus to the edges, and 15 of those are more sensitive cross-type and 11 can be used stopped down to f/8 – that may not be useful to many of you, but if you shoot wildlife or aviation and you are slapping on long glass with teleconverters, it’s helpful.

It also has the same 91,000 pixel meter with face detection implemented for phase detect AF. Interestingly, there is no on-sensor phase detect, which is odd considering the push to use the live view by giving the camera a tilt-screen – so to take advantage of the great AF you’ve gotta use the OVF.

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The best part about all of this is that while it’s clever on paper, and wondrous in use. All of the technical things I’ve just listed sort of just effortlessly happen in use. I first, and most notably, saw this when a friend and I were shooting at this empty townhouse we were playing in, that had no running electricity, and the daylight was minimal at noon much less when we were shooting around 18:30, in Toronto in October. When the time came where it was dark to the point of requiring 20/20 and slow steps to navigate the hallways, when we should’ve packed up, we began to hit stride and the best shots kept coming, so we just kept on shooting, and the camera gave me the confidence to do that.

Its combination of high dynamic range at high ISO and low light focusing ability, are as harmonious as gin and tonic, and will have you grinning like an idiot not just because it’s so capable, but because it’s as predictable as a sunrise.

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08-features-4-stars

It’s interesting that it’s the listed feature set that caused many D700 users to prematurely kick dirt in the D750‘s face. They rallied that the D700 used CF cards and that those hardly fail. Well, they do, and frankly, I’d rather have the 2 SD card slots any day over a single CF. I always have the second slot mirror the first, for security, and high grade SD cards are great, and SDs are cheap. “Ok, but the D700 had 1/8000 shutter speed,” they would then wail. Yes, good point, except it also had a lowest ISO of 200, which sort of negates the benefit of having 1/8000 over 1/4000 of the D750. I’ll take the lower ISO any day of the week and twice on Sunday. There is no point in comparing the two cameras, to be frank, not in a tech world whose evolution is exponential.

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The rest of the key features of the D750 are plastered all over the Internet, but to be concise here’s a basic list:

24.3MP sensor
6.5 FPS
WiFi
Tilt-Screen
2 SD card slots
U1 & U2 total recall modes
Stereo Mic
ISO100-12800 Expandable
Multi-CAM 3500 II

As can be seen, the feature set of the D750 is a pleasant blend of D610 and D810, and doesn’t disappoint unless you have utterly specific needs. Those of a video persuasion will be pleased as punch with the stereo mic and headphone ports, along with the auto ISO in video; the Flat Picture Control ability to record uncompressed via HDMI to an external recorder, and the ability to change aperture exposure with buttons versus rings. I haven’t tested the video functionality to a high degree as I do little video, but have good friends who have spoken highly of the camera as a video shooter, though always end with a disclaimer that if you want a video camera you may as well just get a GH4, and that the D750 doesn’t shoot 4K is a disappointment.

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In addition, the tilt screen is going to be welcomed warmly by video shooters, and still photographers alike. I think more and more pro-sumer DSLRs will now be coming with tilt/articulating screens due to the positive response to this one. As it was the first out of the gate, Nikon did a good job, but those late to the party will probably make a better entrance, fixing the one major fault of the 750’s.  The tilt screen is advantageous for a dozen situations, but would be good for a bushel of them would it have touch screen ability. Touch screen just makes screening images on camera so much quicker, and makes focusing easier while using live view. I feel this was a misstep to omit it.

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ISO1600, 50mm f/2, 1/25

Oh, lest I forget to mention, then there’s the ‘Quiet’ modes. Yeah, well, they’re not so quiet. The quiet mode feels almost as loud, and more drawn out. Shooting it in quiet environments was sort of pointless, as the noise it makes is like the stifled cough of a self-conscious butler – awkward and more noticeable.

*note: WiFi option for live view streaming to an iPad or iPhone/handheld device has a quicker response time than expected, but still too limited for my liking to make it worthwhile for anything other than sending images wirelessly. Until the capability is there to adjust more camera settings while in the WiFi live view, I won’t use it much. Honestly, I would rather they put in a USB 3 instead of USB2 to make data transfer and tethering faster.

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What is there really to say here? It looks much like the D610, which looks pretty much identical to the D7100, a camera that costs a thousand less than the D750. What’s going on here? Well, in actuality the D750 is a bit bigger, it’s more robust with its monocoque magnesium build. That magnesium is what helps keep this thing so light, and while some have echoed that too light equals cheap, you won’t notice it when you have a decent size lens on it, and then you’ll be thankful for it as the hours pass. It being light is a good thing.

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Another good thing is the camera is extremely customizable, and combing that with the U1 and U2 modes makes for speedy transitions from one environment to another, and general speedy use. It’s still amazing to me that the D810 doesn’t have these total recall modes, and a huge turnoff that it doesn’t.

But, personally, the best bit of the design, is the grip. It’s the best grip I’ve ever had the pleasure of using. For those with big hands, holding most cameras can be like shaking hands with a hobbit – you sort of shake fingers. This though, is like shaking the hand of your father-in-law, it’s firm, has depth, and lets you know it’s there.

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Well I guess this sort of ties into design and value, but the build quality is, overall, what you have come to expect from Nikon DSLRs, and especially those of an FX nature. All the Nikon full frame cameras just feel solid, like there is little fear of dropping them or banging them into things. This is great for me, as I view most electronics, as tools, and I don’t like to molly coddle them. Due to its lightness, it can come across as a bit less sturdy than the D810, and even less so than the D610, but I wouldn’t be put off by that.

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When you do pick up a full frame Nikon these days, you can’t help but think that over the years they’ve continuously beaten on the craft to come up with a formula for something solid and reliable. It reminds me of Porsche this way, they don’t look good (Porsche fans will never get me to think they do until Porsche changes), but the benefit of building what is essentially the same car for decades is that they’ve pretty much figured out all the problems, and solved them.

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It costs $2,300 before you take it to the register, and that’s no small amount of money, but in the camera world, for what you’re getting, I really can think of only few equal or better values. Some may be swayed since D610s can be had now for about $1400, and after tax that’s near-as-makes-no-difference $1000 less than the D750. That’s enough for someone building up to get a decent tripod, a nifty 50, maybe even a 35 1.8 and maybe a flash, depending on how you shop. To me, for most people, this would be the stiffest competition.

What the creation of the D750 has done, in my opinion, is render the D810 and D4s niche cameras, for those in need of oh-so-many pixels, or an absurd amount of frames per second. Otherwise, why would you not get the D750? I don’t really know. I mean, avoiding the 750  because it has a tilt screen and SD cards, is sort of like avoiding Blake Lively in your bed because she has a mole.

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ISO 800, 85mm f/2.2, 1/500

So what it doesn’t quite look like a Nikon flagship or thoroughbred, it damn well performs like one. It’s a blessing that walking around town, it looks about the same, and behaves as civil as any smaller DSLR, but when called upon, it pushes the edge of the performance envelope. I know no other DSLR that does this Jeckyll and Hyde trick so well.

It’s actually a bit weird at first, because it looks so much like a DX DSLR in the vein of the D7100, so when you pick it up, and it doesn’t have the mechanical heft of the D810 or grunt of the D4s, you have to have faith that it’s going to perform. Because the magic is on the inside, you have to trust something you can’t see, and when you trust something like this you expect to feel detached, but you don’t. You feel capable, no matter who you are, and that’s a wonderful thing.

So what I’ve realized is that Nikon hasn’t really built a new camera. What they’ve done is create a new yardstick.

Get yours here. Really, get one.

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All edited images were done using the SLR Lounge Preset System, and Photoshop

More Sample Photos

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CREDITS: All photographs shared by Kishore Sawh are copyrighted and have been used with permission for SLR Lounge. Do not copy, modify or re-post this article or images without express permission from SLR Lounge and the artist.

About

Kishore is, among other things, the Editor-In-Chief at SLR Lounge. A photographer and writer based in Miami, he can often be found at dog parks, and airports in London and Toronto. He is also a tremendous fan of flossing and the happiest guy around when the company’s good.

86 Comments

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  1. LA Starshooter

    I bought the Nikon D750 and its a great all-round camera.  It can do sports, events, and, most importantly for me, it can deliver on  beauty. I shoot mostly in flat picture and it delivers awesome graduations on skin tones. 

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  2. Michael Miller

    Of course if Nikon put in a touchscreen in the D750, it would hurt sales for the D850, which Nikon knew they were working on.

    Great article.

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  3. Sarah Bergner

    Thank you for such an in-depth article!  I will be upgrading this year and would like to get a D750, but it sounds like commenters think an upgrade/new models will be released soon… do you think it is worth waiting it out (and if so, for how long) or just going for it and committing to this one?

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    • Kishore Sawh

      Sarah, hi there, and you’re most welcome. That’s an understandable concern you have there, for sure. I know the the common thing on sites is to suggest to buy the latest an d greatest (affiliate purchases do help us stay afloat), but I think it’s important for you to know why you’re upgrading, and what you need. The thrill of a new camera wears off fast, and more often than not I see purchases made for the wrong reasons and the upgrades don’t make much of a difference. 

      The D750 is a very capable camera and a workhorse for countless wedding shooters I know. As  such, it’s hard to tell you it’s not a good choice right now. To me, if you’re thinking of upgrading TO a D750 at this point, 2 or more years into its life, it suggests you don’t require a camera that’s right at the edge of the envelope, and thus this would do fine. It’s got great AWB, and AF is far better than the D610. Does your work need something more capable? How much practical difference will some new features make to you?  I can’t comment on new Nikon cameras in the pipeline but I’d suggest taking rumors with a grain of salt. 

      I also can’t imagine the D750 not being a good choice if a successor comes out soon. I would say it’s a great option, and if you can get one on sale, or with a good rebate or even a quality refurbished one, that would be great. Save some cash, molly coddle it less, get more use out of it, and spend the rest on some new or better glass or something. That’s my suggestion. Hope it helps. 

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  4. Ajit Kamble

    Finally, added D750 in my kit. Amazing camera. Slimmer and lighter than D610. Better autofocus and lowlight performance. Thanks Kishore for helping out and providing your valuable feedbacks. I started from D610 and upgraded body to D750. Now i use D750 as main  camera and D610 as a backup. It completes my photography kit.

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    • Kishore Sawh

      Ajit, that’s great to hear man. That’s a nice one-two punch you’ve got there and should suit you well for quite some time. If I was able to help, I’m glad, and do share some of your imagery with us. Cheers

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  5. Will Taylor

    I have a D750 as my main and a D600 that I use for backup shooting mostly weddings and portraits. Two things have me wanting to upgrade from the D600. First of all its just not as reliable. When shooting, especially in low light, the D750 far exceeds the image quality when you zoom in and look at the subject. Also when I go to edit I have to do more work on my D600 files to get the colors to match that of the D750. I’ve been looking into the D500 but not sure If I would have the same problems with having to edit for color matching. Also the D610 but not sure how much better it would perform from the 600. I’ve also thought about just getting a second D750 as I love the one I’ve been using. HELP!

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    • Kishore Sawh

      The D750 is significantly better than the D600 and D610 in low light. Period. It also handles AWB better. Neither are as good, however. The D500, while magnificent, may be annoying to have as the second shooter because you would need different lenses or may have to do the mental arithmetic on the fly to figure out what lens you need to match. Frankly, at this point, for you for weddings, I’d say another D750. That said, if it was primarily portraits, and you needed to save the few hundred, the D610 is still a brilliant portrait camera.

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    • Kishore Sawh

      In case you’re interested, BH is selling factory refurbished D750s for $1,399. Check it out: https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1237482-REG/nikon_1543b_d750_dslr_camera_body.html/BI/5982/KBID/6868/KWID/kishsaw

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    • Nick Viton

      Kish, strictly speaking, you don’t need different lenses with the D500. FX lenses will work on it. Also, you don’t need to do any mental arithmetic; just put the lens on and look through the viewfinder. No math required! I do realize what you’re trying to say. However, when shooting DX, you honestly don’t need to try and “match” it with FX.

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  6. Amol Thorat

    Read many of the comments here and most of the guys seem like pro photographers with expensive systems. So I am feeling a bit underwhelmed to ask but I am looking at upgrade from my trusty old D5100. I have DX lenses and no FX lens yet. I would be shooting landscapes mostly and rarely portraits. Refurbished models of both 610 and 750 are well under $1500 this holiday season. In fact 610 can be had under 1k while 750 at 1300 mark in a deal. Do you think it is wise to put out more and get the 750 as I would not be upgrading frequently? Or going with 610 is a better choice for me? I got to buy FX lens any way. Thank you.

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    • Kishore Sawh

      Amol, hi there. First off, do not feel any way about your D5100. I’ve taken photos with that thing and cameras of that level that no one would guess were taken on them. That said, I understand you wanting to move on, and if it is for certain that you want to go full frame, then the D610 and D750 are both great options. I use a myriad of cameras, including those two, and my D610 I always refer to as my ‘ride of die girl’ because it’s just dependable and I don’t worry about beating it up.

      If you’re in a studio setting then there will be little that the D750 really will be much better but for landscapes I’d say go for the 750, generally. The 750 has significantly better auto white balance (really significant) and handles noise better. I mean it is really just the camera the D610 should’ve been, and if you’ve got big hands as I do, that grip is lovely.

      The one thing I would probably ask yourself is if you really need to go fx. Frankly, depending on the level of glass you have (if you’ve got a stable of high-end dx lenses) then maybe you don’t need to switch. I hope this helps.

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    • Ajit Kamble

      Hi Amol..
      I will add my three months experience of D610. After discussing here and very well guidance by Kishore, i purchased D610. This camera is built like a tank and my main go to camera. Since from purchase date, i have worked on 5 Baby Photoshoots, 2 weddings.. and results with this camera were stunning. With my experience its not only your camera body but lens too which makes great photographs. Its your call if your work really wants you to move to Fx family else invest in lenses. If no budget restrictions, go for D750 which comes with 51-Focus points. Its a great Nikon Top Notch Camera.

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  7. Gerald Garcia

    Great review! Google led me here as I will be upgrading soon and I’ve narrowed it down to the D750 and 80D. I think I will end up with the D750 as I’ve been wanting to try FF for the longest time. I will excuse the author for saying Porches are ugly. An exception would be the iconic 964. If you think that is ugly there is something wrong with you. ;)

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  8. Umberto Uderzo

    I’m after the sensor IQ of the D750 but what scares me is the high amount of failure reporting i read in various forums. I’m currently shooting on 5DMKIII and the higher DR and missing of vertical pattern noise when pushing shadows would be very welcomed, but while 5D3 is built like a tank, will D750 stand serious caving shooting sessions, which require the body+lens to be carried in a water sealed suitcase into a caving bag and stand some occasional hits? And will the weather sealing stand some humidity? Looks like the sealing is better guaranteed when the LCD screen is kept into its niche?
    Thanks.

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    • Kishore Sawh

      The D750 is a magnesium alloy and carbon reinforced thermoplastic composite body, so it should be tough. The 5DIII is magnesium allow for the most part, I believe. I’ve always been nervous with any body with a tilt screen, and it’s safe to say it’s always going to be more prone to damage, but the D750 is a bit of a jack-of-all-trades and those who use it REALLY rag it out. But it’s hard to imagine either camera would have an issue being in a secure hard case. Dropping it..maybe it’s a little less robust in those cases given the 750 has a pop-up flash where the 5DIII doesn’t, and the screen, but should there be a major discernible difference? I can’t imagine there would be.

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  9. Ajit Kamble

    I am really confused between D7200 – D610 – D750. I have D7100 and want to upgrade. i am in wedding portrait and sports photography. 1/4000 shutter speed on these two FFs will be a concern.?
    at the end i just bother about best image quality. please suggest.

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    • Kishore Sawh

      Well the most glaring difference, of course, is the sensor size. In my opinion the FFs will give you the best quality, and these two will essentially give you equal quality at that. I use a D610 most of the time as a workhorse, even to this day. The D750 is certainly better at AWB, and faster, much improved ergonomics and so on. But really the D610 takes brilliant images. I know many working fashion and portrait pros who live by it.

      You’ve got to know what you’re planning to shoot and buy accordingly. If you’re doing weddings then D750, because of speed, screen, ergonomics and so on. I mean, are you really gong to need 1/8000 shutter speed? There are ways to get around that. I think the real question now is if to get the D500. I’m doing my review on it now, and it’s astonishingly good, if you can live with the crop sensor. I really prefer not to have the crop other than when shooting aviation as I often do.

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    • Ajit Kamble

      Thank you so much for your reply…
      Its been a month reading blogs, reviews to make up my mind. I have finally decided to buy either D610 or D750. Both camera’s have pretty awesome user experiences. To start up and considering budget, eventually i may end up with D610. But finally i will be having FF.

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    • Kishore Sawh

      no problem. Honestly, you would be fine with either. If anything save the money from the 750 on teh 610 and get more or better glass, or upgrade the body quicker. the 750 and or 610 both are upon due to be refreshed

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  10. Daeshawn Ballard

    This review was so good! I’m really considering this one and this helped.

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    • Kishore Sawh

      Daeshawn, I’m glad you found this helpful, and even though it’s nearly 2 years old, I can still recommended this as a workhorse DSLR. Cheers

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  11. Mike Pukmel

    Thanks Kishore for the great review. I usually wait a year before looking at picking up a new release, until the good, bad and ugly have been found and published by the real photographers in the world (like yourself). Since you’ve had a year to use it, can you comment on the build quality? I have handled the 750 in stores, seems OK, the only thing I did notice on two demo bodies is that the top rear dial control did feel a little flimsy, and that is the one I use most. I will buy one anyway, but curious if you’ve had any issues with the controls on the 750.

    And, Id say that the way you used under exposure is awesome! Your images of this beautiful model look smooth and silky. The under exposure also gives them look mysterious look.

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    • Kishore Sawh

      Mike, my apologies for not seeing and responding to this sooner. First, thank you for your kind words here, it’s nice to hear you’ve enjoyed the review. It was an honest one. As time has gone on, we’ve seen that D750s have had some shutter problems for some, but Nikon has taken care of those for owners, and we have people in SLRL who have shot hundreds of thousands of photos on D750s without the need for any servicing. Matt shot his to 300,000 without the need. Honestly, I’ve owned Nikon SLRs and DSLRs for so long, and I don’t think you need to worry about the dials at all. If you have any further questions, feel free to email me [email protected]

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  12. Cristian Clerc

    Hi Folks
    I had read a lot of posts and reviews about this camera. Once I take the jump and sold every canon thing that I had and I bought the D300s, an amazing change. Now 6 years later, I still use my D300s, but It is time for an upgrade.
    I have a Tokina 11-16mm F/2.8 ATX Pro DX II, a Tamron SP AF 17-50mm f/2.8 XR DI-II VC, and a Nikkor 60mm f/2.8G AF-S Micro AF ED FX. I certainly use mostly the Nikkor for portraits and some macro, and the Tokina for architecture photography.
    Maybe I kept the D300s for backup.

    So the thing is, FX D750 or D7200 DX?

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    • Mike Pukmel

      Full frame, full frame!!! Im going through the same gut wrenching as you. If Nikon had built a “D400” it would be a much more difficult exercise. But they didn’t. Canon has their EOS 7D Mark II but Nikon has chosen to put most of their efforts into full frame bodies for some reason. I haven’t picked it up yet, but due to the recent price drop to $1,900, its less of a battle for me. This is my reasoning to go for the 750 over the 7200, maybe it will help: I mostly shoot my kids sports games, but a second love is city scapes (I live about a half hour from Boston). With the 750 I can put the camera in 1.2 or 1.5 crop mode, get awesome reach with the 70-200 2.8. Its not a 300 but in crop, its just about as good. I’ll get about 16 megapixels in crop mode, which is plenty for soccer. The camera focuses excellent, and good in low light, so the 750 will cover this pretty well. But we can put the body back in 1:1 crop mode, and have a full frame! Same pixel count as the 7200 but larger pixels and all the awesome low light capabilities and detail that gives us. As for lenses, even if you’re a pro, the Sigma Art line seems to be just as sharp as some of the Nikon counterparts, at a deep discount. As long as you’re not, say, a photojournalist who takes their gear into the most difficult environments, the sigmas seem to hold up fine. At $1,900 its competitive with the sony’s. I didn’t get a sony mirrorless FF due to the lack of native sports lenses, and the focusing for mirrorless for sports just isn’t there yet. I priced upa full Sony kit and Id have to use one of those awful A mount to E mount adapters, and their 70-100 F/2.8 is $600.00 more than the Nikon (new prices). If I priced in the more expensive Sony lenses, the bulky adapter, there is no benefit to going Sony, and its not going to focus nearly as well as the tried and true DSLR technology, even if its old tech. Good luck with your decision!

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  13. Mark Aldridge

    Great, awesome, fantastic, and best of all; humorous!!!
    Really enjoyed your review. I am definitely sold!
    You have a fantastic art in your expression as well…
    Just the style in which you have explored the D750 had my heart skipping numerous beats!
    Trouble is, I have tasted opium…err the touch screen of the D5500..LOL…so, I will wait till the imbeciles at Nikon will add one to this camera. Additionally they kicked me in the gut, and it still hasn’t fully healed, when they did not fix the spots on my D600 and instead nefariously introduced the D610. Thank goodness for Costco, they listened to my plea and returned the garbage even 9 months after…so, now I am tasting the D5500 and the only thing I like about it is the inebriation of the touch screen!
    Anyway, keep up the good work, you definitely brought some joy to my evening!!!

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  14. Jesper Ek

    Nice review.
    I’m happy everyday over my D750.

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  15. Rafael Steffen

    The idea of bringing back shadows is just amazing!

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  16. Jorge Vazquez

    i am going to have a hard time deciding between D750 and the D810 … really.

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  17. Alex Ron

    i am totally in love with this camera… or at least i was… such sharp crisp photos even with cheaper glass wear attached ;)

    why do i say it was… because some grub broke in to my house and stole it. I felt like i lost a loved one… this camera is a pleasure to use. takes a little getting used to but, wow, it turns out to be a work horse… also heaps that it is weather resistant!!!

    love the article.

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    • Kishore Sawh

      While I’m stoked you loved the article, man, I feel for your loss of a camera. I hope you had insurance and that the bastard who stole it comes home to find his wife with another man. All the best Alex

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  18. Basit Zargar

    Awesome capture

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  19. John McCosh

    Just got mine yesterday, upgraded from D600 only because I dropped my D600 and has been sent away for repairs and I need to shoot a wedding next weekend. Current backup is a D90 but after using the D600 I couldn’t go back to the D90 so now the D600 can back up my D750. The more I use this camera the more I love it. This has got to be the best camera on the market for wedding shooters. Great review, Thanks.

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    • Aaron Cheney

      Congrats John! i am strongly debating on switching from Canon to Nikon and would love to end up with the D750 but I am also intrigued by the D610 and I was wondering if you could answer a question? I don’t know how different the D600 is to the D610 because I have used Canon for 11 years. i know with the D750 you can completely underexpose the image and bring it back up in Lightroom to a good exposure and not lose detail or basically ruin the image. (Not the case with Canon). is that something you could do with the D600 as well? Not that I plan on purposefully underexposing all my images haha. It is just something I really liked with the D750

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    • John McCosh

      Hi Aaron,

      The D600 & D610 are pretty much the same camera. The D610 replaced the D600 because of the dust problem with the D600 sensor. There was a slight increase in Frames Per Second on the D610 over the D600 but that was the only difference apart from the new shutter mechanism.

      The images from the D600 / D610 can be recovered quite a bit as well. But I would image the D750 will do a much better job as the ISO range is greater and it has been noted in reviews that there is greater detail in the recovered shadows on the D750.

      Hope this helps.

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  20. Rome Wilkerson

    I have been a Nikon fan for many years I have in studio a number of Nikons ( D800’s older D700 ) to name a few when I first heard of the Nikon D750 was not sure if this was for me. I shoot in studio as well as on location events wedding and so on. So I ordered one and I must say much like the above review its a winner as for as a full frame in its case. Love it.

    Rome

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  21. Steve VanSickle

    Argh. As badly as I want this camera, I upgraded to my first full-frame (D610) back in March, thus I can’t quite justify the expense for this body so soon after. Though, my inner 6 year-old is still saying “BUT I NEED IT!”

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    • Kishore Sawh

      Steve, really I use the D610 most and I love it. Is the 750 better? Sure, but not a necessary upgrade for most people for most types of shooting. I’ve done a review of the D610 you can see here if it makes you feel any better ;-) Cheers

      https://www.slrlounge.com/nikon-d610-review-get-get-still-question/

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    • Steve VanSickle

      Kishore- don’t get me wrong, I’ve been absolutely thrilled with the D610 (with the Sigma 24-105 f/4 Art lens, just…wow). But I shoot a lot of concerts and other low-light situations, so while I certainly make it work, there’s that lingering “I could have…” if I’d waited another 6 months. But I’m not all that sad, as I’ve got a pretty good setup, as is. Besides, lighting and posing if the new frontier for me!

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    • Nick Viton

      you could always sell your D610…

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  22. Jason Markos

    I’m not sure what makes a ‘technically good’ review… but it sure made me want to buy one, even more than I already do!

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    • Kishore Sawh

      Ha, well Thanks Jason. I wasn’t particularly trying to sell them (I get no kickback from Nikon), BUT, really didn’t have much of a disparaging word to say about it. Cheers

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  23. Shawn Anderson

    I was already convinced this would likely be my first full-frame camera, based on other reviews, but your article has cemented my decision. Very well written and incredibly thorough! Thank you for contributing to my addiction! LOL

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    • Kishore Sawh

      Cheers for that Shawn! It’s not a bad camera to channel your addiction towards. And you won’t be alone.

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    • Rafael Steffen

      When you make the jump to Full Frame camera you will love the bokah that it produces with the prime lens! I love it! Its hard to shoot anything else after you go Full Frame.

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    • Shawn Anderson

      Okay, so I did it…I bought a full frame camera. But, not the D750. I went with the D810 and have not stopped grinning! I love it!!!

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  24. Greg Geis

    I thought your review was great and I very much enjoyed the pictures and style. Well done. There are other reviews if someone wants to download ISO tests.

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    • Kishore Sawh

      Greg, hi there. It’s always nice to know something like this is received well, understood, and appreciated. Thanks very much for that, man. Cheers

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  25. Doug Pfaff

    This is, by far, the best pure writing I’ve encountered while reading an article about photography. There may be d750 reviews with more technical data, but none as enjoyable to read as this one. Well done, Kishore.

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    • Kishore Sawh

      HI Doug. Those are some very kind words, and they are extremely well received. Thank you so much, really, for taking the time to mention – made my day. Cheers, and best for the season! – Kish

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  26. robert s

    im certain we all have seen a few light leak videos but this one here seems like its very extreme.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LynWn0DvdO0

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  27. Matija Vuri

    i often ask myself why i am staying on Canon… :O thats a nice one Nikon!

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    • Kishore Sawh

      Matija, it certainly is hard to argue with what Nikon is putting out, but from the few photos of yours I just checked out, you’re doing just fine with the Canon. Nice work man. Cheers

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    • Matija Vuri

      thanks Sawh,
      But u know how picky we photographers are… :)
      and of course i do a lot video, and in this field im still more happy with canon.

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  28. Brandon Silvera

    So happy I bought one. Absolutely love this camera.

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  29. Adam Wold

    Edit: “I mean, avoiding the 750 because it has a tilt screen and SD* cards, “

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  30. Nick Viton

    BCE Place and Eaton Centre! T-Dot REPRESENT!

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    • Kishore Sawh

      Haha, yeah Nick, always. When I’m back up there I’ll hit you up. We should shoot. Or if you’re in Miami… Cheers

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  31. robert s

    the review is nice but for me, its out. a reviewer should not manipulate an image with heavy PP to show a cameras true potential. I would expect the option to download the raw images so I can assess the cameras real potential without them being touched. no specs for the images shot is also another reason its out as a reliable review.

    A review of a piece of gear is not to showcase ones talent. you showcase the cameras talent. dpreview shoots random images, even if theyre very boring but its not processed. and they have full rez images you can assess. I dont care for the heavy diffusion in the images. those to me could have been shot with a D300.

    thank you anyway.

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    • Kishore Sawh

      HI Robert, thanks for expressing your opinions. Regarding how women ‘should’ be shot, is just that however, an opinion, and again, it’s artistic preference and license. I, and many in our audience here, am well aware of the benefits that can come from overexposing an image, particularly pertaining to skin. That said, it is unfortunate that the images were not in the artistic vein that you like, and for the future reviews, I’ll keep in mind to vary the style of shots included. Incidentally, not all the images are Photoshopped, let alone heavy handed with it, some bound by contractual obligations.

      You do bring up an interesting point though, and one that I think many people, myself included would do well to spend some time thinking about. You mentioned more than once that the images look like they could’ve been taken on a D90 or D300. To some degree, I can see where you are coming from, but really, I, and other fine people as yourself, can take photos with a D3100 that most people won’t be able to discern that they weren’t taken on a D4s. That’s just the nature of the craft really. It really comes down to, as I noted in the review, how these different bodies get to the result – some will do it with much more ease, and be more forgiving than another, and then allow for harsher environments. I see too many, especially photographers relatively new to the arena, that think a more expensive camera is always going to take better pictures, but it’s far from the truth when it comes down to it. Thank you anyway.

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    • robert s

      thank you anyway. we will agree to disagree. this is not a “camera” review. a lot is missing for me to consider it so.

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    • Raoni Franco

      Great article, thanks! But I have to agree with Robert here. Most of these photos are just showing your work and they are not very usefull as ilustrations for a review. The thing about the hi-res images or even raw files to download is something I never understood in the Slr Lounge “policy”. The files you guys show in the review are in such a low res that it´s hard to judge. Anyway, thanks a lot for the article.

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    • KO KO

      Absolutely right Mr. Robert s
      Acurate MAJOR points sir.
      Though, thanks for your efforts Mr. Kishore Sawh

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  32. Austin Swenson

    I always kind of thought that there should be some kind of middle option between the 610 and the 810, and here Nikon comes out with a smashingly good model to fill that niche.

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    • Kishore Sawh

      You’re not alone there Austin, the gap in features and performance, and the gap in price certainly did leave room for a middle option. I think it’s surprising Nikon delivered so well with one, and one that covers so much of what so many asked for. Cheers

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  33. Tyler Friesen

    Very well written! I liked this.

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    • Kishore Sawh

      Thank you Tyler, I’m glad you did, I certainly enjoyed my time with the 750. Cheers

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  34. Pentafoto Tm

    Nice review but what’s with the underexposure in the girl shots ? The images you posted look like out-of-camera Jpegs, you’re not doing the sensor a favor by not processing the raw images.

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    • Kishore Sawh

      Pentafoto, hi, and thank you! The camera was a joy to use. Underexposure is a matter of artistic license when done deliberately, as is the case here. The photos are meant to be slightly dark. I think the notion that a photo is amiss if it’s not hitting what a meter would call perfect exposure is something many photographers would do well to get away from. One of those, know the rules before you set out to break them, but certainly do break them, sort of things. A sea of ‘perfectly exposed’ images can be terribly boring. A ‘properly’ exposed frame does not a good image make. Of course, it comes down to a matter of preference, and I prefer a bit of mood. Each to his own.

      I will say though that as far as doing ‘justice’ to the sensor, I think it should work the other way around as well. But the fact the sensor can produce tones like it does and detail as it does, even in the light I have provided, with the level of exposure I’ve decided upon, is testament to how good the sensor really is.

      Cheers, mate

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    • J Frid

      Good point. It is what artists do: make creative decisions

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    • Kishore Sawh

      Indeed it it. Cheers, J

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    • robert s

      if anything, when shooting women, you should overexpose so it clears the skin and gives a light glow. 1/3-1/2 over the reading. all imperfections are lessened as well. im not a fan of underexposed low constrast images and they dont really suit a review for a camera when they are heavily PP. this is just a showcase for work, not the camera at all. these could have been done with a D300 or even D90 and some PP.
      any images shot at iso 3200-12800? this is really what id like to see.

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  35. John Cavan

    I’ve only been hearing great things about this camera, it has a lot to offer and the reviews, as you do, say it delivers on the offer. I will admit, however, that I still find the positioning a bit surprising. It’s like Nikon is building out amateur, advanced amateur, semi-pro, and pro in the full frame market except that I would have probably pegged the D750 as semi-pro if it wasn’t for the D810 line. The Df is, I suppose, the answer to Fuji and the nostalgic line… which, I admit, has appeal to me. In any event, variety is good.

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    • Kishore Sawh

      John, I’ll chime in with you there in that the positioning is a bit strange. I do have an issue with this notion though, of pro, semi pro, pro-sumer in regards to these cameras. I’m not exactly sure what defines each as such, nor that there should be qualifiers like that – its all bathed in ambiguity. I think we would then have to define what a pro is. I know, and know of, many photographers shooting for agencies and big publications who shoot with what some call pro-sumer cameras. D610s etc…

      I do love the variety though, as you do. That Nikon is offering so many FX bodies is brilliant. Cheers

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    • John Cavan

      @Kishore – It’s not really that I think the designations mean much of anything with respect to pro vs amateur user, but that the feature set is a continuum and so if the range is amateur to pro from a feature set, the four would appear to line up that way. That’s a specification designation, not a usage one, plenty of examples of professionals shooting with “amateur” cams and vice versa.

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  36. J. Cassario

    Great review Kish, and glad to see that we agree that this camera is a gem, a genuine gem :)

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    • Kishore Sawh

      Thanks man, and really it surprised me over and over again. It doesn’t bark at you, but it just kept allowing me to do things, and feel comfortable shooting when most other times I would’ve packed up, or not tried. Loved it.

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    • Rafael Steffen

      I love to hear this comment coming from you after reading your article that you prefer a Leica camera to your D4S.

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    • Rafael Steffen

      This is by far the best review that I have read lately on the Internet. I would love to see some reviews done by some Nikon Ambassadors or people who have switched from Canon to Nikon.

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    • J. Cassario

      Thanks Rafael, I absolutely love the D750

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  37. Aaron Cheney

    Does anyone want to sponsor me with a D750?

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  38. Lex Arias

    Very complete review!!! and yes i want one…!!!

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    • Kishore Sawh

      Thanks much Lex, it’s what I now recommend to those looking for an FX body – bar none. Cheers

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