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Beautiful Wedding Video Shot On iPhone 7 | Further Proof Your Gear Is Probably Good Enough

January 26th 2017 8:12 AM

Smartphones have been giving digital cameras a run for their money since their inception and now that iPhones can shoot 4k video, they are able to provide a surprisingly formidable challenger to expensive video equipment, though of course, the hands that hold the iPhones play a role that cannot be overstated in the final product. Supremely talented Colorado-based husband and wife wedding videography duo, White in Revery, comprised of Kristine and Calen Rhome, prove just how much you can do with an iPhone 7 and 7 Plus, a little bit of supplemental gear, and some creative expertise in their stunning video of a Moab, Utah elopement.

[REWIND: Wedding Workshop | Photographing The Couple: Outdoor Couples Portraiture]

Using the Filmic Pro app, DJI Osmo Mobile, Beastgrip Pro, and an assortment of Hoya filters and Moment lenses, they’ve managed to capture a moving and cinematic artistic rendition of their couple’s big day in the awe-inspiring Moab Red Rocks.

Without being told expressly how the video was shot, it’s doubtful that anyone would ever guess that anything less than professional video equipment was used to create the video. (Video playback may require you to click the play button and open the video in YouTube)

[REWIND:] FILMIC PRO TO RELEASE LOG VIDEO PROFILE | LOOKS LIKE THE NEXT GREAT STEP FOR MOBILE VIDEO

On the video’s creation, White in Revery says this:

The reason for filming this on the new iPhone 7 and 7+ was because we wanted to showcase the fact that it doesn’t matter what gear you use to create an amazing film. We get pretty caught up in gear sometimes and really wanted to let this project be a reminder that it truly is about the story, the couple, and the editing that makes a great film – not having all the newest and latest gadgets.

You can check out more of their work on their website and Facebook page.

Is the iPhone an industry killer or a killer tool for professionals in the right hands? Maybe a little of both?

About

Seattle based photographer with a side of videography, specializing in work involving animals, but basically a Jill of all trades.
Instagram: @HJRphotos

Comments [9]

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  1. Peter Buitrago

    Nice composition at 1:46 :/

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  2. Andrew A

    These articles REALLY must stop. An iPhone7, 8, 9 special edition plus SE is not a substitute for a D4, D610, or even a D5300.

    These shoots are done in beautiful locations with very specific and circumstantial factors on the back end and then we get these articles about how a cellular phone is going to replace the camera and that simply is not true.

    I stopped reading anything from Fstoppers.com when they showed complete disregard for their readers with thier idiotic article of the same theme except their photographer talked about using a cellphone exclusively.

    The stars align from time to time, you get a great photo on your phone. It’s great device but this clickbait nonsense must stop.

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    • Kishore Sawh

      But is this clickbait or personal sentiment? Either way it certainly isn’t disregard for our readership, as our audience spans the gamut of casual and beginner to professionally published. Is this not for you? Perhaps. But it’s probably unfair to begrudge us catering to part of a demographic you don’t belong to. Furthermore, appreciation for what can be done on a phone, I don’t think anyway, should be frowned upon. No photographic belief is perhaps more exclusionary and inhibiting to growth and staying current than our professional cowboy notion that ‘real’ photographers won’t use particular gear nor appreciate it. Come Andrew, skip it and check out what else is in stock. And tell us what you’d like to see… we’re open.

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    • Holly Roa

      I’ll add that this is certainly not a case of aligning stars – these are talented and well-practiced professionals making the point that you can use the tools at your disposal to create something beautiful with the right skills. On top of that, this isn’t the first time I’ve seen incognito iPhone footage – a friend of mine made a nature video on a Canon 6D with one clip from an iPhone – an owl in flight. I would have never thought it was another camera if he hadn’t told me, let alone an iPhone. They truly are viable for video clips. You have it with you all the time, and if you see something you’d like to use for b-roll or something, it can blend seamlessly.

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  3. sam tziotzios

    Ahh that open field/land at sunset. Nothing beats it :)
    Somehow when I read the title I kind of knew thats where the shoot would be.

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  4. Lakin Jones

    Its a nice video, but lets be real, this isn’t just an “iPhone” its $1800 – $2800 worth of equipment.

    The major place the iphone and lense combination fail is chromatic aberration. With the wide angle shots of the environment are back-lit there is a noticeable purple glow around a lot of edges.

    iPhone7 – $649 – $849
    iPhone 7plus – $769 – $969
    DJI Osmo – $299 (2x is one for each camera)
    Moment Lenses – $90 – $270
    FilMic Pro – $10
    Filters – $??

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    • Kishore Sawh

      I think it’s fair to remove the regular iPhone7. They probably just listed all they used, but it would seem the iPhone 7plus could be used alone. Sure the Osmo, moment lenses etc, but you’d need tools like that for a bigger rig anyway. GH4 or something you’d still want a gimbal of sorts, various lenses, and all more expensive, so. the cost wouldn’t be the same.

      I think what definitely could be said here is that it’s still going to take software to color grade and such

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    • sam tziotzios

      agreed,. there is alot of camera handling going on (cranes, jibs, sliders., steadies…) that I can sense just watching it.

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