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Inspiration

Award-Winning Photographer Redefines Alone Time

By Lauren Kermelis on November 4th 2013

Do the people in these images oddly bare a strange resemblance to each other? Maybe it is because they are both the same person. Montreal-based artist and photographer JJ Levine is not only credited for his intimate portraiture, but also for his ability to cause people to think critically when it comes to the role of gender within society.

[Rewind: ‘What I Be Project’ Exposes People’s Insecurities for the Camera’]

Within this series, Levine’s photos depict both the male and female gender roles being taken on by a single person. No digital manipulation was used beyond compositing the two images, however many factors such as makeup, wigs, clothes, and the subtle alteration of body-language and gestures were combined to create the aesthetic feel behind this project.

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JJ shoots on medium-format positive film with studio lighting, he then scans the 120 slide film and collages the various images together digitally.

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To reach the level of comfort and familiarity that these photos exhibit, Levine chose to use only people that he knew personally for this project.

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Levine received a BFA in Photography and interdisciplinary studies in sexuality from Concordia University. Aside from the display of many of his works throughout the world, Levine has been the recipient of many grants and awards, amongst the most recent of which was being chosen as the 2013 recipient for the Canada Council for the Arts Project Grant.

[Via Buzzfeed]
Images Courtesy of JJLEVINE

Lauren Kermelis is a freelance photographer wedding, portrait, and event photographer based out of Southern California.

Q&A Discussions

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  1. Warpaint Project Gender-Bends the Workplace

    […] Award Winning Photographer Redefines Alone Time] […]

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  2. D

    Is it just me or is the curtain in the 2nd to last pic (the shower scene) supposed to be translucent but the guy’s body is nowhere to be seen behind it?

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    • R L

      My guess would there is a second white curtain behind the blue that actually sits inside the tub. My shower has a similar thing.

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  3. Bogdan Boeru

    You said no Photoshop and I was a little intrigued on how exactly does he blend the photos without any kind of digital intervention, especially since the two persons are the exact same one. Near the end, bam, “he then scans the 120 slide film and collages the various images together digitally.”. If he’s not using Photoshop what does he blends them in? Microsoft Paint?

    Sorry, but the title is deceptive. When you say Photoshop, you say digital interference. Making a collage from two photos and adding shadows and so on IS Photoshop and it is digital interference.

    His endeavour is “artsy” and can have a social and psychological impact, but his technique is nothing more than 5 minutes in photoshop using basic techniques.

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    • Q

      Read that sentence again. Following that statement is “however many factors such as makeup, wigs, clothes, and the subtle alteration of body-language and gestures were combined to create the aesthetic feel behind this project.” They meant photoshop isn’t used to make the person look different, only to stitch the two shots together.

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    • Christopher

      Correction Issued: These are composites so there is digital manipulation. We were focusing on the fact that the subjects were not altered in any way.

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