Here at SLR Lounge, we are currently eating, breathing, sleeping and dreaming about light. With the release of Lighting 101, you’d think we would get a small break, but actually, our video editors are just finishing up Lighting 201. Lighting 301 is in the queue and Pye is filming Lighting 401 as we speak!

So, when I saw DigitalRev post a video about DIY lighting, I had to share. I just want to preface this by saying that I love Kai and Lok at DigitalRev and their lighthearted, slapstick videos make me laugh. They can get a bit over the top with the language and bawdiness (did I just use that word?), so if that is not your cup of tea, then I’d recommend you skip the video below.

[REWIND: DIY: HOW TO CREATE AN AWESOME PRODUCT SHOT WITH ONE LIGHT AND FOIL]

In the video, 5 DIY Lighting Setups You Can Do At Home, Kai and Lok show five different DIY projects that can be done inexpensively and creatively. Using Pringles cans, picture frames, and more, they give you ideas for lighting and light modifiers using items you can find around your home.

The first DIY project is the hot light. Using any lamp you have, and some diffusion, you have an easy, continuous light that didn’t cost you any extra money. Then they make a diffuser using a picture frame and diffusion paper (it looks a bit like wax paper, but they do not specify what it was).

DIY-lighting-setups

Sometimes, you need more directional light, and, in that case, grab a can of Pringles in your pantry, empty it out, cut off the bottom and voila, you have a snoot. The fourth project is called a “Swedish Softbox,” which is basically any type of fabric that is white and lets soft light through. And finally, with the “Deep Dish Beauty Dish,” using a foil take out container, you can get a flat light similar to a beauty dish.

Watch the video and get some ideas of the items you can use around the house for your DIY “lighting studio”:

Obviously, these are just ramshackle solutions that are not quite as nice as the real deal, but if you ever find yourself in a pinch (either on your pocketbook or if you’re unprepared), look around the house and get creative. You might find something usable to give you the look you need for your image.