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Gear Rumors

24mm F/1.4 Art | Sigma’s Next Art Prime Coming In Q1 2015?

By Anthony Thurston on November 16th 2014

Sigma surprised quite a few of us during the end of the year trade shows, announcing two 150-600mm Sports lenses and not one Art lens. Fear not, it appears that Sigma’s next Art prime masterpiece could be coming in early 2015.

sigma-24mm

According to a new report coming from Sigma Rumors, a couple of Sigma lenses that were originally slated for a late 2014 release have been pushed back to Q1 of 2015. Among those lenses *could* be the rumored 24mm F/1.4 Art.

Sigma going with the 24mm F/1.4 Art makes sense, given the void on the wide end of their lens lineup after they discontinued their old 20mm and 24mm primes. I know many others are looking forward to an 85mm F1.4 Art as well, but I honestly don’t see that being a priority for Sigma since their current model is already a top performer in the market.

[REWIND: Sigma: Professional Lenses Without Breaking the Bank | Gear Talk Episode 9]

In addition to the 24mm F/1.4 Art, the rumor talks about the “consumer market” getting a lot more attention, as far as products go. So, be ready for more Contemporary labeled lenses from Sigma in the near future.

Regardless, assuming Sigma keeps up its current run of form, be sure that more great things are coming in 2015. Stay tuned and we will keep you updated with all the latest regarding Sigma announcements and rumors.

[via Sigma Rumors]

Anthony Thurston is a photographer based in the Salem, Oregon area specializing in Boudoir. He recently started a new project, Fiercely Boudoir to help support the growing boudoir community. Find him over on Instagram. You may also connect with him via Email.

Q&A Discussions

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  1. Kevin Cucci

    For the record. I absolutely love my sigma 35 art. But… I know a few wedding photographers who put a lot more wear and tear on their lenses then I do, and have heard in two occasions the mount crumbling to pieces. I feel like Adam said, the initial (keyword) build quality and feel is fantastic. But still for some reason I have more faith in my L lenses. They may not look as nice and shiny, but they have stood their ground. I did not own the Canon 35L, so I bought the sigma.. But I DO own a 24L II and will not be selling it off to buy the sigma version, no matter how good the reviews on it are.

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  2. Aaron Cheney

    The art lenses are so well made!

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    • Greg Faulkner

      Are they as durable as the Nikon lenses though?

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    • adam sanford

      Greg: that’s the rub. The Canon and Nikon users not yet lured to Sigma glass still site quality concerns from years ago. But unless you’ve been under a rock for the last 2-3 years, Sigma has really turned their quality act around for the better.

      So I think Sigma is doing really well in *initial* owner satisfaction (IQ, build quality, usability, etc.), but they haven’t racked up 5, 10 years of regular use on these lenses… yet. So the Sigma Art naysayers/holdouts/skeptics will probably wait until the 35 Art or 50 Art is a few years older before they put more faith in longer term metrics like toughness, reliability, AF consistency over the longer term, ability to handle moisture, sand, cold, etc.

      I feel Sigma’s pain to some extent. I work in medical devices and many surgeons won’t give a brilliant idea the time of day until it has 5-10 year clinical outcomes. Trust cannot be argued for so much as earned over time. Sigma is clearly on the path to earning it.

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    • Greg Faulkner

      Putting aside concerns based on previous products though there are still people claiming these things are falling apart, I’ve read on this site in comments that users have had the mounts come loose etc. I read stuff like that and think I’ll pass. Thats not writing Sigma off based on past experience its based on my peers current experiences. Just my opinion, I’d be interested to hear what actual owners of these art lenses think who have also owned Pro Nikon and Canon glass

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    • Matthew Saville

      Greg & Adam,

      I think that, having used lots of different copies of various Art lenses, …in short, you gotta be a real serious abuser in order to bust up a Sigma Art lens. Yes, if you’re truly one of the roughest, get Canon L or Nikon flagship. But for 99% of photographers, Sigma Art glass will still be Rolex / Leica territory.

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  3. Daniel Sun

    Please make the 24 1.4 77mm filter thread

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  4. Greg Faulkner

    What is the build quality of these Sigma Art lenses like though. I’ve read/watched the reviews saying how they are build well etc etc but do they last? Are they actually built to a high standard or do they fall apart after a wedding season I’ve read a few people complaining that the mounts drop to bits?

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    • Matthew Saville

      I wonder if one of those was me? My friend destroyed two 35mm Arts, and yes it was the mounts that got beat up. But, he’s a war photographer turned wedding photojournalist, and his gear takes a severe beating.

      All in all, I’d wager that Canon L and Nikon’s flagship lenses do indeed have superior build quality, or at least they have better longevity. The Canon 24 and 35 in particular, are known to be absolute rocks. You could play hacky-sack with one for a year and it would still be perfectly sharp and perfectly functional, I bet.

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  5. Rui Pinto

    Any ideas about the price of this?

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    • Kevin Cucci

      Their record so far is $899 – 35 and $949 – 50 so I’m guessing $999 – 24 haha.

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  6. Mads Helmer Petersen

    I really hope the 24 mm will be on the marked very soon – otherwise I have to buy the alternative from Canon ……

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  7. robert s

    the 35 and 50 art outperform both canon and nikons version. this should be no different. and at half price will take a lot of sales from both. sigma are stepping up to their level. finally! where the hell were you till now? selling crap (and still selling) for so long.

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  8. Brandon Dewey

    I hope it is the 24 f/1.4. It would be great if it was released before the summer so i could use it for astro photography.

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    • adam sanford

      I keep hearing the 24/1.4 is the go-to lens for astro work. True?

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    • Matthew Saville

      Adam, it really was, until the Nikon 20mm f/1.8 G came along. But either way the Rokinon is so much better than both the Canon and the Nikon, that I simply cannot recommend either of them for astro work.

      I was really looking forward to seeing what Sigma did with their own 24 1.4, because I’d love to own one for wedding photojournalism, but once Nikon did the 20 1.8, I stopped caring. I’d much rather have the extra 4mm than the extra 2/3 of a stop, especially with the D750’s new high ISO awesomeness…

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    • adam sanford

      RokiBowYang glass is DOA for me as I tend to need AF at every focal length I use, and I don’t shoot astro. I’d personally use a 24 / 1.4 for environmental portraiture and street.

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    • Matthew Saville

      Yeah but Adam, IMO at that point for “street photography” and environmental portraiture, it’s a choice between a Sigma Art lens (if you want something hefty and solid) or a Nikon f/1.8 G lens, (if you want something light and compact yet still incredibly sharp) …it’s hard for me to recommend any Canon or Nikon 1.4 glass… Yes, Canon and Nikon 1.4’s are good, (except the Canon 50 1.4) …but their price is just a little too prohibitive compared to the alternatives.

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    • adam sanford

      Agree 100%, Matt. Some small but discreet f/2 lenses would be killer for me.

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    • Matthew Saville

      That’s what the Nikon 1.8 G’s are, considering the light falloff they’re basically the next generation of f/2 primes. Although depending on what you shoot, stopping down for sunstars is much more awesome on the older Nikon 35 f/2 than the newer 35 f/1.8 G… https://www.slrlounge.com/nikon-35mm-f1-8-g-fx-field-review/

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    • Matthew Saville

      Indeed it has been kind of a bummer that thus far, Canon’s endeavors in the “affordable prime” market haven’t gotten as far as Nikon’s. The 24 and 28 2.8 IS are great, and the stabilization instead of a faster aperture is probably a necessary evil for video shooters.

      The Canon 35 f/2 IS is sweet, but not as impressively sharp as the Nikon 1.8 G’s. Then again, stabilization and video shooters who only care about 1920 pixel resolving power, yadda yadda.

      I do think that Canon is on the cusp of stepping it up across the board with their affordable glass. Their work with STM lenses, including the 24-105, is pretty impressive.

      We’ll see what they do in the near future.

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  9. Kevin Cucci

    The Canon 24 f/1.4 L II is a phenomenal performer. It is better then Canon’s 35L and 50L in my opinion, so this should be a very interesting comparison. Sigma’s new art primes are considered just as good, if not better then their Canon & Nikon counterparts.. but this one is going to be tough. I am excited to see what happens.

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    • adam sanford

      Agree the 24L II is a excellent performer (and it’s really well built), but the test data — regardless of what people think of it and its value in rating a lens — says that the 24L II is not great in the corners, just like the 35L and 50L. Keep in mind, the 24L II isn’t even *Canon’s* sharpest 24mm lens. That distinction belongs to their 24mm tilt-shift.

      So I expect Sigma to repeat their 35 Art and 50 Art sharpness levels in a 24mm format, trounce the 24L II in that metric, and sell a lot of lenses at a great price. I recognize that there’s a houseload more to a lens than sharpness, but that seems to be the metric Sigma has set as the most important thing to deliver, and of late, they’ve been delivering it.

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    • Matthew Saville

      Like ALL the other Canon f/1.4 lenses, the 24 L is pretty much only good at one thing: L-grade build quality and autofocus. When it comes to actual optics, it’s laughably beaten by the Rokinon 24 1.4 in almost every respect. You would never want to shoot astro-landscapes with the Canon, if you had the Rokinon at your disposal.

      In short, it will be effortless for Sigma to beat Canon at 24/1.4, not to hard for them to beat Nikon at 24/1.4, and a moderate challenge for them to best the Rokinon 24/1.4. The Rokinon is already incredibly sharp wide open, but Sigma could improve on that a little bit. Mainly what I’d like to see in a Sigma is, less vignetting and near-zero coma. That would be truly impressive.

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